continental glacier


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continental glacier

[¦känt·ən¦ent·əl ′glā·shər]
(hydrology)
A sheet of ice covering a large tract of land, such as the ice caps of Greenland and the Antarctic.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the ice age, so much of the world's water was locked up in continental glaciers that the height of the oceans dropped by 120 meters.
Today, geologists know these rocks as glacial erratics, stones transported many thousands of miles to their current resting place by the great continental glaciers that once covered the land.
The combination of alpine and continental glaciers through the Pleistocene pushed tundra and boreal forests far down into what is now the United States.
The geological history of glaciation has been a subject of lively debate ever since Swiss naturalist and geologist Louis Agassiz (1807-1873) convinced the scientific public that his idea of vast continental glaciers was correct.
5 percent, and Asian continental glaciers, formed in the continental climate would shrink by 24.

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