continuant

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continuant

[kən′tin·yə·wənt]
(mathematics)
The determinant of a continuant matrix.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where Aristotelian ontology requires a decision between IHD as based on continuants or on occurrents, BFO can accommodate both and is thus closer to a commonsense thinking that can distinguish the falling of water from a waterfall, which has determinate spatial boundaries.
This expansion is sustained, to a certain extent, in the activity of continuant and transient authors who, together, are responsible for most of the papers published throughout the period under study, which points to the stratification of scientific production (see Merton, 1996) associated with a reduced number of authors, especially continuants.
Moreover, it is natural to think that a continuant, such as a table, cannot be the cause of its component parts.
5 an occurrence of a continuant?' According to Carnap, internal questions can be settled by empirical investigation.
We describe a closed form for these equations, using a cyclic version of the continuant polynomials.
Third, Emmet characterises a process as "a continuant with an internal order and a direction of change" (p.
Arguing first that the best way to understand continuant is as something that primarily has its properties at a time rather than atemporally, the paper then defends the idea that there are occurrent continuants.
The book is divided into ten parts: breath management, posture, laryngeal and intralaryngeal function, resonance balancing, nasal continuants and non-nasal consonants, the phenomenon of vibrato, registration, healthy singing, pedagogy issues and performance concerns.
Processes, Continuants, and Individuals, HELEN STEWARD
For continuants, which by definition lack temporal parts, this answer is not available.
Processes are continuants with an internal order and direction of change.