continued-fraction expansion

continued-fraction expansion

[kən′tin·yüd ′frak·shən ik′span·shən]
(mathematics)
An expansion of a driving-point function about infinity (or zero) in a continued fraction, in which the terms are alternately constants and multiples of the complex frequency (or multiples of the reciprocal of the complex frequency).
A representation of a real number by a continued fraction, in a manner similar to the representation of real numbers by a decimal expansion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This results in a continued-fraction expansion, analogous to that found in the previous section, of the form
This hierarchy may be expressed as a continued-fraction expansion, which, in the asymptotic case of an infinite number of fluxes leads to a general description ranging from collision-dominated to ballistic dominated regimes.
The idea of continued-fraction expansions presented in sections 3 and 4 may be generalized as follows, by taking into account that, in the presence of a temperature gradient, the fluxes of order m, m + 1, and m - 1 may be coupled not only by the wave-vector k but also by the temperature gradient itself; as a consequence the hierarchy of equations (4.3) may be generalized as follows (Zakari 1997):
Continued-fraction expansions for the effective thermal conductivity are established, leading to the expected limiting behaviours in collisional and ballistic regimes, and providing an interpolation in the intermediate regimes.