continuous deformation

continuous deformation

[kən¦tin·yə·wəs ‚dē·fȯr′mā·shən]
(mathematics)
A transformation of an object that magnifies, shrinks, rotates, or translates portions of the object in any manner without tearing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, the greater continuous deformation of the roadway surrounding rock was supported by the sufficient elongation of the support system that the high stress was released and the influence of excavation disturbance was absorbed.
Recent studies using SAR from 1992 to 2012 images have revealed a continuous deformation pattern with one of the greatest velocities in Europe (around 11 cm/yr) on its maximum area [15, 17].
(3) Continuous Deformation. When the middle bench is excavated, the settlement of the pipe-roof continually increases and then slows with the initial support of the tunnel and the pipe-roof bearing the rock mass pressure together.
Suresh, "Discrete and continuous deformation during nanoindentation of thin films," Acta Materialia, vol.48, no.9, pp.
Deformation of the crust in this region occurs by a range of processes that includes (a) brittle deformation on major strike slip faults and (b) continuous deformation in the subsurface, including crustal flow.
3 Large plastic deformation occurs in the contact zone because the continuous deformation and flow of mental occurs along rolling direction and spread direction.
Although creep, the continuous deformation of metals under sustained load, probably occurs at all.
The formation of nanosized fibers is an overall result of production of microsized micelles of thermoplastic polymers in cellulose acetate butyrate and continuous deformation, elongation, and coalescence of the micelles to nanofibers in and at the outlet of a die before the composite fiber is completely solidified [16].
(2) Stochastic analysis of Continuous deformation. At present, less investigation is carried on in this aspect and only Wu Zaiguang et al.
The block-discrete element method (B-DEM) and granular DEM have certain advantages in the simulation of noncontinuum dynamics; however, it is still difficult to simulate the continuous deformation processes of a material using these methods [9].
Kusner is a geometer, an expert in the analysis of variational problems in low-dimensional geometry and topology, which concerns properties preserved under continuous deformation such as stretching and bending.

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