control feel

control feel

[kən′trōl ‚fēl]
(aerospace engineering)
The impression of the stability and control of an aircraft that a pilot receives through the cockpit controls, either from the aerodynamic forces acting on the control surfaces or from forces simulating these aerodynamic forces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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What's more, nearly one in four respondents not currently under GDPR control feel adopting the regulations now will help them as they prepare their companies for expansion into Europe.
The airplane has an all-moving horizontal tail (a stabilator with a push/pull cable) and to improve control feel, the stabilizer has an anti-servo tab attached to the tail with a composite membrane.
There was no loss of control or abnormal control feel, so he continued the flight and landed uneventfully.
Vehicle C Control Feel and Control Sound scored lower than Vehicle C's Overall ISQ Score (Figure 12).
Rotter in 1966, in his article "Psychological Monographs", and considers that people with a predominantly internal locus of control feel more in control of their own lives and success, demanding more of themselves and focusing on what they can do on their own to deal with current problems.
On the other hand, managers in subsidiaries with high parental control feel much more often than managers in subsidiaries with low parental control that their juniors miss "brand strategy knowledge" (32 % vs.
sbbt g Hatton's application for the return oa wBh of his fighter's licence, which he lost after being exposed taking cocaine, will be a formality because the British Boxing Board of Control feel he has served his punishment.
This high service rate allows much better control feel than USB, wireless, or other non-real time pendants, according to the company.
People with external locus of control feel they have little control over how their life evolves and believe that life experiences happen from the "outside-in." They tend to take less responsibility for their actions than those with internal locus of control, and place responsibility on some known or unknown force out of their control, such as chance, fate, powerful others, the government, or God.
Individuals with external locus of control feel that external forces such as chance, luck, powerful others, authorities, etc., determine their fate (Levenson, 1981).
Conversely, individuals with an external locus of control feel helpless and that they are victims of fate.
First, it helps improve the airplane's control feel and response, especially the ailerons.