controlling depth

controlling depth

[kən′trōl·iŋ ‚depth]
(navigation)
The least depth in the approach channel to an area, such as a port or anchorage, governing the maximum draft of vessels that can enter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gonzales, who heads the global corporate affairs office of the company, said the berth expansion, all with a controlling depth of 13.5 meters to 14.5 meters, will further strengthen the port's capacity to service larger box ships.
The berth expansion, all with a controlling depth of 13.5 to 14.5 meters, will further strengthen MICT's capacity to service the world's larger box ships and the increasing volume that comes with them.
With a berth line of 1,627 meters and a maximum controlling depth 12.5 meters, CGSA is equipped with six quay cranes and four mobile harbor cranes which can accommodate nine vessels at one time depending on the size of the vessels.
Controlling depth and speed with weight is the primary key.
The channel has a controlling depth of 45 feet and is 1,075 feet wide at its widest point.
Turning the cutter in the opposite direction can be an effective technique for controlling depth. Operator skill and experience are paramount in this operation.
Accurately controlling depth, slope angle and trench grade are among the most difficult and time-consuming aspects of construction projects that require excavation.
With a berth line of 1,627 meters and a maximum controlling depth 12.5 meters, CGSA is equipped with six quay cranes and four mobile harbor cranes that can accommodate nine vessels at one time depending on the size of the vessels.
First phase development includes a 600-meter berth length with a 14.5-meter controlling depth, an 11-hectare container yard, a 250-meter coal bulk dock, conveyor belt-equipped silos and a 21-kilometer access road leading to the terminal.