conventicle


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conventicle

1. a secret or unauthorized assembly for worship
2. a small meeting house or chapel for a religious assembly, esp of Nonconformists or Dissenters
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
On March 13, 1668 the Commons debated renewing the Act against Conventicle or illegal religious meetings, which was due to lapse at the end of that year.
It numbered among the examples of "Gods heavi Judgements on Sabbath breakers" privately compiled by the London artisan Nehemiah Wallington, who enlisted the downfall of this impious conventicle for a new Puritan agenda -- as further proof of divine rage at the Caroline reissue of the 1617 Book of Sports.(114) Thomas Fuller assigned the "dolefull even-song" a prominent place in his influential Church-History of Britain, published during the Interegnum in 1655, and it continued to appear in encyclopaedic anthologies of providences like Samuel Clarke's Mirrour or Looking-Glasse both for Saints, and Sinners.(115)
The earliest evidence of this is the protocol of the depositions of an Anabaptist preacher by the name of Johannes Balbus, a former priest, who was imprisoned in November 1529 for public preaching in Prague, where at the time there existed a clandestine Anabaptist congregation or conventicle with close connections to Anabaptists in Moravia.
The appeal to the Augsburg Confession's endorsement of bishops was intended to signal that the Moravians were a church, not a sect or a conventicle.
"Though I am accused and condemned for being at a conventicle, truly if praying for the King and Parliament and edifying one another in our most holy faith, by keeping conventicles, then I am guilty: but if a conventicle be such meeting as in the least measure is against any of those, then I detest it and abhor it." (29)
Unlike Calvin, who was wary of the use of allegory, they do not admit the possibility of a conflict between what Coleridge called in Bunyan the man of the Conventicle and the man of Parnassus.
However, this is incomplete insofar as it does not take into account that the Orthodox church required metanoia from those outsiders with a view to their joining (or coming back to) the Orthodox church--as the article clarifies later: Both heresy and schism, or even the term conventicle, denote the ecclesiastical identity of these bodies vis-a-vis the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church and constitute a continuous invitation for their return to the unity of the ecclesiastical body.
In 1726, the King banned these meetings in the Conventicle Act.
Although conventicle meetings in homes were outlawed in 1690, Kevorkian shows how the Pietists maintained an informal "shadow network" (169) until at least the 1730s.
The book covers the period between the emergence of Oxford Baptists as an illegal conventicle to the limited religious freedom granted by the Act of Toleration in 1689.
For Sire and Stachniewski, Bunyan's Calvinist belief in predestination is so repulsive, allegedly for inducing mental torture over the status of one's election, that the only serious avenue for reading Bunyan today is to follow Samuel Taylor Coleridge's cue and forsake the Bunyan of the conventicle for the Bunyan of Parnassus.