conventional

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conventional

1. Law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
2. Arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
3. Bridge another word for convention
References in periodicals archive ?
In conventionalist approaches, a collective subject projects a "cultural tradition.
Popper's description of the conventionalist response to challenges to scientific theory influenced how we constructed our framework.
From here, though, the conventionalist can point out that we all come to "know" that lying is wrong because our formative encounters with lies involve learning not only that a lie is telling someone else what you take to be false while intending that she believe it, but also that lying is wrong, that it hurts other people, that other people will stop trusting you if you tell lots of lies and get found out, that honest people are good, that we need to be able to trust each other in order to get along with each other, and so on.
I would counter that by saying that my approach is only half conventionalist.
Given the long established, conventionalist attitude of the legal industry, it probably won't come as a shock to you that the profession of law is one of the biggest markets behind the tech curve.
The conventionalist complains that there is no such universal: the norms governing promising are constructed in response to local historical circumstances.
It imposes itself on the individual, controlling the "subject": it is not the transparent medium that the instrumentalist describes, nor the means of consensus that the conventionalist conceives, it is, to misquote a philosophical phrase, a (material) process without a subject.
24) A realist, a subjectivist, and a conventionalist may exercise judgment to reach the same result: all may agree that a given pitch is a strike, regardless of the theory of umpiring to which each respectively subscribes.
Even if one could separate a mere analytical question of how contracts are constructed, (3) at least two opposing narratives remain: promissory and conventionalist theories.
And if it is a matter of decision, it is necessary to abandon the essentialist vision, in favor of the conventionalist connotation of identity" (7).
Kreko and Kovacs (2012), for example, have found in their investigations of the voters of Jobbik (an openly antisemitic and authoritarian ultranationalist parliamentary party in Hungary) that they were the second least traditionalist and the least conventionalist group among all voter groups.