conventional

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conventional

1. Law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
2. Arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
3. Bridge another word for convention
References in periodicals archive ?
What makes the Constitution of the United States a good focal point, so that adhering to it might be justified on conventionalist grounds?
I take a strongly positivist or conventionalist line in this essay because it is important to understand the proliferation of legal truth, and the proliferation of its power, not as mere defects or imperfections extraneous to law but as central features of what law is and what law does.
Is literary studies really dominated by professors who, brandishing conventionalist theories of truth, value, and meaning, insist that literary and cultural texts are and mean no more than what we decide?
"No individual experiment considered important by parapsychologists has passed the test of close scrutiny by an independent expert.' We need to know what is meant by "passed the test" and who qualifies as an "independent expert." A conventionalist (a term for "skeptic")?
In Kymlicka's case, his commitment to liberal autonomy overwhelms his commitment to cultural pluralism; in Taylor's case, liberal autonomy becomes the basis for distinguishing fundamental individual rights his skeptical communitarian cultural relativism makes him wary of defending; and in Walzer's case, his paean to Rushdie's free speech rights as an expression of liberal autonomy sits uncomfortably with his conventionalist theory of justice.
Quineans of a conventionalist sort might reply that it is our conventions which make "If C, then x=y" true.
According to a conventionalist view of morality, it does appear that conformity to the dictates of one's group is a part of the agreement entered into whenever we decide to become members of a group.
In fact, it was precisely the accusation of being a conventionalist (made by Soterios Barber in reviewing his earlier work) that inspired Clinton to write his new book.
Gasiorek does not approve of postmodernism, which he sees as formalist and conventionalist, even though he reads postmodern novels in such a way as to ignore their formal properties.
Maxwell's interpretation of the second law of thermodynamics marked a significant change in physics, away from determinist and realist representations of the world towards a probabilistic and conventionalist view.
Brinker argues that Nelson Goodman's `misreading' of Art and Illusion as conventionalist could have been prompted by Gombrich's view that `illusionistic representation depends on the artist's vocabularies' (p.
This poses challenges for the view, as apparently institutionalized in Anderson's work and other conventionalist views, of a Europe threatened only by the `externalities' of terrorism or pariah forms of organized criminal enterprise, outside the established forms of civil society.