conventional

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conventional

1. Law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
2. Arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
3. Bridge another word for convention
References in periodicals archive ?
The fourth major school is the conventionalist or sentimentalist school that goes back to the moral philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment.
This becomes clear if we consider in more detail the conventionalist picture of the process by which meaning is determined: conventionalists clearly underestimate the scope open to the interpretive assignment of meaning.
Popper had suggested, in response to issues raised by conventionalists, that different procedures might rationally be adopted in terms of our theories, depending on our view of the aim of science.
in gatherings, Non technology savvy/ conventionalists
Because people are more likely to be realists about science and conventionalists about other categories, let us stick with science.
67) For these reasons, conventionalists argue, "the Constitution is a particularly good focal point" and should be interpreted to preserve its ability to function as such.
Whatever analysis conventionalists in the US and all over the world make, and regardless of whether the naE[macron]ve bet on traditional equations for relations with the next administration, nothing will be guaranteed in the Obama era.
Third, it is this hierarchical logic that enables the Campus Conventionalists to see attacks on HU's traditional Black system from every direction.
His philosophical procedure is rooted in conventionalism, which implies that those who accept his aesthetics are necessarily conventionalists.
Finally, in his symposium piece in this issue, Professor Merrill argues that conventionalism leads to judicial restraint more than textualism and thus that conservatives, as advocates of judicial restraint, ought to be conventionalists.
Conventionalists see ethics as a piece of artifice; given that values and principles are artificial constructs (rather than handed down by divine command or written into the fabric of the universe), they are themselves pieces of technology that can be engineered to better suit human needs.
Indeed, to a large extent, the conventionalists are content to determine this issue as a matter of commonsense, by reference to shared moral views on acceptable standards of behaviour.