conversion disorders


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Related to conversion disorders: conversion reaction

conversion disorders

[kən′vərzh·ən dis‚ȯrd·ərz]
(psychology)
Somatoform disorders characterized by physical symptoms referable to the somatosensory nervous system or special sensory organs that cannot be explained on the basis of a medical or neurologic disease and that are caused by psychological factors. Symptoms include paralysis, blindness, ataxia, aphonia, and numbness of the feet.
References in periodicals archive ?
A case of conversion disorder analyzed from a psychodynamic, psychophysiologic, and morphodynamic perspective.
Conversion Disorders commonly appear in the aftermath of stressful life events, especially sexual trauma, which in rare instances may manifest as camptocormia.
Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of alpha-theta brainwave Neurofeedback treatment for the internal self-exploration of individuals with conversion disorder.
Conversion disorders in adolescents: a practical approach to rehabilitation.
Future studies should further assess those with seizures and conversion disorders to determine if there are any effects of AEDs on driving performance.
The current study aimed to investigate parental acceptance- rejection/control and interpersonal difficulties in patients with conversion disorder. It was hypothesized that: the patients with conversion disorder will differ from those with general medical conditions on parental acceptance rejection and interpersonal difficulties; there is relationship between parental acceptance rejection and interpersonal difficulties.
The common psychiatric disorders related to the onset of vomiting were either a major depression or a conversion disorder. Continuous vomiting was usually due to a conversion disorder, while in many cases of habitual postprandial and irregular vomiting, major depression was observed.
However, even in the first Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-1--APA, 1952), which was published eight years before The Myth of Mental Illness, the term hysteria was considered to be outdated and was replaced with the term 'conversion disorder' (APA, 1952: pp 107-108).
Conversion disorders effectively respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) including gradual exposure to anxiety triggers.
Comparing symptoms conveyed by conversion disorder patients and those produced by "paralysis" suggestions in hypnosis, also revealed similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb.
In child and adolescent psychiatry and in pediatric consultation/liaison psych settings, hypnotic interventions have been used as either the primary or secondary treatment for a variety of problems presenting to clinicians, including acute or chronic pain; conversion disorders; habits such as nail biting and finger sucking; tics; nausea; headache (including migraine); needle phobia; enuresis; performance anxiety; sleep-walking; trichotillomania; and others.