symptom

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symptom

Med any sensation or change in bodily function experienced by a patient that is associated with a particular disease

Symptom

 

an indication of a phenomenon, for example, of a disease. Many types of symptoms are distinguished in medicine. Constitutional symptoms characterize diseases of varying genesis and include weakness and increases in body temperature. Pathognomonic symptoms indicate a definite nosologic form; a stabbing pain in the epigastric region, for example, is typical of a perforating gastric ulcer. Subjective symptoms are only revealed upon questioning the individual, and objective symptoms are readily observable through examination, palpation, percussion, auscultation, and laboratory and instrumental diagnostic methods. Signal symptoms are the precursors of a disease. They include early symptoms, such as chest pains with pneumonia, and late symptoms, such as peritoneal irritation with cholecystitis.

A disease is said to be atypical if its characteristic symptoms are absent from the very beginning; an example of an atypical disease is the painless form of myocardial infarction. Modern therapeutic measures and protective inoculations can substantially alter the symptoms of a disease and even cause them to disappear. Diagnosis and prognosis are based on a knowledge of all of the symptoms of a disease.

symptom

[′sim·təm]
(medicine)
A phenomenon of physical or mental disorder or disturbance which leads to complaints on the part of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
DSM-IV limits conversion symptoms to either voluntary or motor functions which are, of course, neurologic functions.
In Freud's day, conversion symptoms were believed to arise from an unconscious psychic conflict so unacceptable to the individual that it could not be confronted and was thus "converted" into a physical deficit, allowing partial expiation of the forbidden conflict.
It is this function of conversion symptoms (as is true of other symptoms) that led to them being described as compromise formations.
This led to a regression to conversion symptoms and an earlier developmental organisation.
In summary, this case illustrates the role of conversion symptoms in an incest victim.
Childhood emotional abuse and dissociation in patients with conversion symptoms.
Distribution of conversion symptoms in the sample n (%) Asthenia 60 (100) Aphasia 58 (97) Crying-convulsions 56 (93) Numbness in extremities 55 (92) Fainting-falling 49 (82) Loss of strength in the extremities 33 (55) Pseudopsychotic delusion 31 (52) Derealization 31 (52) Similar to grand mal seizure 30 (50) Impaired consciousness-disorientation 12 (20) Table 5.
Present study is consistent to an extent to the previous findings that conversion symptoms are seen more often in poorly educated people of low socioeconomic status (Barnert, 1971; Maxion et al.
Current concepts in psychiatry: Conversion symptoms.
Ergo, the patient may have an underlying, very real medical disorder and still demonstrate conversion symptoms.
Conversion symptoms can be inconsistent and unbelievable, very similar to malingering.
Eigen values and screen plot identified four meaningful factors: conversion symptoms, physical pain symptoms, hypochondriacal symptoms, and body dysmorphic symptoms.