convict

(redirected from convicted)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

convict

1. a person found guilty of an offence against the law, esp one who is sentenced to imprisonment
2. a person serving a prison sentence
References in periodicals archive ?
The court of 1st Additional District and Session Judge convicted Asif Chalgari in the 2016 murder case of Raza Chalgari, who was an uncle of the convict.
In 2015/16, there were 29 people who were convicted of offences under the Animal Welfare Act in the Northumbria Police area, down 12% from the 33 people who were convicted in 2014/15.
Forces across the UK revealed 309 police officers and police community support officers (PCSOs) were convicted of offences from 2012 to June this year.
North Wales Police said six police officers and one PCSO had been convicted of a criminal offence since 2012, the figures released to the Press Association through a Freedom of Information request show.
Cases dealt with by Coventry Magistrates on September 25 included: Elita Barkouska, 35, of Leopold Road, Hillfields, was convicted in her absence of keeping a vehicle which did not meet insurance requirements.
The Court sentenced them two years imprisonment and (RO 400) fine for each of them and convicted them of storing food products in inappropriate conditions and contrary to requirements of the Food Safety Law and imprisonment for one year and fine each of them (RO 10,000).
The following cases were heard at Cardiff Magistrates' Court: * Helen Adams, 35, of Heritage Drive, Cardiff, was convicted in her absence of exceeding a 30mph speed limit and fined pounds 60 with a pounds 15 victim surcharge and three penalty points.
Devon and Cornwall Police - a PC convicted of burglary as a teenager.
Issued upon the directives of Dubai's Attorney-General, Essam Eisa Al Humaidan, Maysara has come to make easier the life of those convicted by the court and fined," Bin Khatem said yesterday.
He was then convicted twice by Newcastle magistrates in 1993 for shoplifting.
It is unclear whether those who will be released are war convicts, political prisoners, or convicted criminals, according to AN NAHAR.
Smith provides detailed accounts of the circumstances of the crime, where most seem to have been convicted on sufficient evidence to prove their guilt, and has then carefully tracked them through government service, private assignment, tickets of leave, conditional pardons and their adjustment to colonial life and eventual anonymity.