convulsive disorder

convulsive disorder

[kən′vəl·siv dis‚ȯr·dər]
(medicine)
Any pathologic condition in which convulsions are a common symptom and characteristic electroencephalogram patterns are displayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, his condition was termed as a convulsive disorder. Earlier this year, his condition was set as Lennox Gastaut Syndrome, a condition on the broader autistic spectrum.
Febrile convulsions also called as febrile seizures, are the most common convulsive disorder affecting 2-5% of children7-9.
Patients with essential hypertension, chronic renal disease, chronic liver disease, diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes, any kind of tobacco use, twin pregnancy, incomplete delivery of placenta, abruptio placentae, placenta previa, any other convulsive disorder, any type of congenital abnormalities, hydrops fetalis and intra uterine death were excluded.
weakness and general tiredness, abnormal electrocardiogram, ankle and leg swelling, asthma, blueness of lips and fingers, bronchitis, chest pain, chronic cough, heart attack, hypertension, heart enlargement, heart murmur, blood pressure, irregular heartbeats, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, leg cramps, low blood pressure, lung tumors, night sweats, pneumonia, shortness of breath at night, shortness of breath at lying down, tuberculosis, chicken pox, measles, polio, mumps, syphilis, prostate tumor, sexual dissatisfaction, sexual impotency, sore on penis, urethral infection, convulsive disorder.
Leppik suggested physicians use a different diagnostic code, such as ICD 9 code 780.39 (for a convulsive disorder), for patients who have had a single seizure but are at risk for a second seizure to avoid the stigma of a diagnosis of epilepsy.
Leppik recommended the ICD 9 code 780.39, which is for convulsive disorder not otherwise specified.
The word epilepsy is a generic term, synonymous with convulsive disorder or seizure disorder.
The likelihood that these children will go on to have a convulsive disorder is similar to or only slightly higher than a normal population, even in children who have had multiple episodes.
LKS may also be called infantile acquired aphasia, acquired epileptic aphasia or aphasia with convulsive disorder. This syndrome was first described in 1957 by Dr.