coordinated turn

coordinated turn

A turn without any slip and skid. A coordinated turn is a balanced turn, in which the ball of the turn and slip indicator (TSI) remains in the center.
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Record Sport can reveal SFA chief executive Ian Maxwell and his SPFL counterpart Neil Doncaster held the emergency summit over three hours yesterday afternoon and agreed to launch a coordinated TURN TO PAGE 55 FROM BACK PAGE crackdown on the troublemakers shaming the national sport.
Some, for example, seem to prefer leading with the rudder then rolling into a coordinated turn. Some aircraft demand lots of rudder input while others require virtually none at all, up to a point.
And mismanaging pitch in turns is a sure way to lose altitude unnecessarily, hurting efforts to carve a coordinated turn.
A coordinated turn further requires a corrective yaw rotation in the horizontal plane to counter the slip induced by the original roll.
27) Turn and bank indicator: Shows rate of turn and whether plane is banked for a properly coordinated turn.
It first moves at a nearly constant velocity from the first second to the 15th second and then executes a coordinated turn in the anticlockwise direction from the 16th second to the 30th second.
When you open your eyes you may be surprised to discover that a slowly entered coordinated turn feels like a climb, largely due to misinterpretation of the g-force you feel.
In a constant altitude, coordinated turn in any airplane, the load factor is the result of two forces: centrifugal force and gravity.
The diagram at right graphically depicts the various forces acting on an airplane in a level, coordinated turn.
For instance, a favorite query of pilots who are established in a normal, level, coordinated turn is, "What control surface are you using right now to make this turn happen?" Without blinking, pilots overwhelmingly proclaim, "The ailerons!" Invited to have a look down the wing, however, they are dismayed to see the ailerons tucked in the neutral position.
As the article noted, the "'aerodynamic best' turnaround, on the other hand, occurs in a coordinated turn, at a bank angle of 45 degrees, at an airspeed just barely above the corresponding stall speed.
If the two are in equilibrium, the ball will remain in the cage, centered, displaying a coordinated turn. If not, the ball will be displaced one way or another.

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