coordination language

coordination language

(networking, protocol)
A language defined specifically to allow two or more parties (components) to communicate in order to accomplish some shared goal.

Examples of coordination languages are Linda and Xerox's CLF (STITCH).
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With coordination languages, programming is split in two separate activities: a sequential language is used to build single-threaded computations, whereas a coordination language is used to coordinate the activity of several single-threaded computations.
A coordination language should orthogonally combine two languages: one for coordination (the interprocess actions), and one for (sequential) computation [Carriero and Gelernter 1992; Ciancarini 1996].
1995] [check] Coordination Languages Durra [Barbacci and Lichota 1991] -- ISETL-Linda [Douglas et al.
The block on coordination languages in Table I classifies these approaches with respect to the process of prototyping concurrent applications.
A coordination language embodies a coordination model; it provides operations to create computational activities and to support communication among them.
We would rather say that Linda is a coordination language.
They might also be separated into two distinct languages, in which case programmers choose one of each: one computation language plus one coordination language equals a complete programming system.
SCA's distributed parallel applications through Linda, a coordination language developed to overcome the problems of hardware, programming and code portability in clusters, now offers programmers the benefit of Alpha's power and speed.
Papers from the conference are collected here, in sections on abstract interpretation, model checking, verification of embedded systems, security, testing, aspect-oriented development, requirement and program analysis, coordination languages, and communication, mobile, and interactive systems.
Le Metayer, editors, Coordination Languages and Models--Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference (COORDINATION '97), volume 1282 of LNCS, pages 274-288, Berlin (D), 1-3 Sept.
Such devices are likely to take many forms, including the form of coordination languages.
An area in which there is current interest in language design is coordination languages [Carriero and Gelernter 1992; Ciancarini and Hankin 1996].

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