cope

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cope

a large ceremonial cloak worn at solemn liturgical functions by priests of certain Christian sects
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cope

[kōp]
(metallurgy)
The upper portion of a flask, mold, or pattern.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cope

1. To cut or shape the end of a molded wood member so that it will cover and fit the contour of an adjoining member.
2. To notch a steel beam, channel, etc., so that another member may be fitted against it.
3. A coping.
4. To form a coping.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the important function that secure attachment plays in coping as contended earlier, we argue that, in addition to directly impacting on how people cope with stress, secure attachment may modify the influence of sex/gender role orientation on instrumental and emotional coping.
At times, self humour can be used to cope with diabetes.
Resilient families cope well by identifying and solving illness-related problems, communicating about symptoms, negotiating role changes, and developing new interests as a family and new ways of emotionally being together.
Keep a scrap of the trim handy so you can check the fit as you fine-tune the cope. With really complex profiles, you may have to check and fine-tune the fit a dozen times before you get it right.
Simulation results prove the theorem introduced in [4] which stated that COPEs maximum coding gain is 2, which is achievable as N grows larger i.e.
Positive and negative coping styles were measured using a revised measure of the Brief COPE (Carver, 1997), which consisted of 24 items and measured problem-focused, emotion-focused, and dysfunctional coping domains that align with Coolidge et al.
In addition to being a culture receiving rare attention by sport psychology researchers, previous studies in the coping in sport literature (e.g., Anshel et al., 1997, Anshel & Weinberg, 1996) have indicated that athletes cope differently in response to different sources of stress as a function of culture.
The behavior that results from their inability to cope with stressors is often the reason for their placement in a residential treatment facility.
Recently several theoretical frameworks, empirical research, and interventions that focus on how couples cope together with life stress have been developed.
However, the current view is that family stress and strain are prevalent and normal, and that understanding family coping styles is necessary to discover why some families are better able than other families to cope with strain.
This study investigated how Chinese college students cope with the stress arising from job hunting.
Koenig and associates (Koenig, George, et al., 1988) also noted that two thirds of their respondents reported using private or personal religious behavior to cope, whereas one third engaged in the social aspects of their religious beliefs.