copper arsenate

copper arsenate

[′käp·ər ′ärs·ən‚āt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Cu3(AsO4)2·4H2 O or Cu5H2(AsO4)4·2H2O Bluish powder, soluble in ammonium hydroxide and dilute acids, insoluble in water and alcohol; used as a fungicide and insecticide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A previous report evaluated the mechanical properties of laminated utility pole crossarms made from decommissioned chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine (Pinus spp.) utility pole wood, untreated virgin wood, and a mixture of virgin wood and decommissioned utility pole wood.
Arsenic, chromium, and copper leach from docks, pilings, and other structures built of wood treated with chromated copper arsenate. Arsenic also is used in boat paint pigments, which may enter the water during careless painting or scraping.
Environmental accumulation of preservative adjacent to a chromated copper arsenate (type C)--treated wetland boardwalk was evaluated.
HBN, a Washington, D.C.-based coalition of builders and environmental and health advocates, opposes the sale of wood treated with chromated copper arsenate because the arsenic leaches out of the wood and can cause lung, bladder, and skin cancer in humans, explains Paul Bogart, campaign coordinator for the HBN.
In the present study, the carefully selected timbers with wide sapwood bands and good biocide penetration would give optimally high biocide retentions, as opposed to an earlier study in which all timbers treated together in one charge with chromated copper arsenate were analyzed (Schultz et al.
On 12 February 2002, the EPA announced that the pressure-treated wood industry has voluntarily agreed to phase out chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood for residential uses by 31 December 2003, anticipating an EPA ban set to take effect in January 2004.
Since December 31, 2003, chromated copper arsenate (CCA)--treated wood products have been limited to nonresidential applications in the United States and Canada after CCA registrants submitted voluntary label change requests to the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States and the Pesticides Management Regulatory Agency in Canada (Lebow 2004).
Leaching of chromate copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative into the aquatic environment A review.
He in turn contacted the Bakersfield, California, manufacturer that was listed on the mangled tag, who told him that the chemical mentioned on the label was chromated copper arsenate (CCA), a wood preservative.
An experiment was designed to compare the dimensional stability of flat decking to ribbed decking using three copper-based preservatives: alkaline copper quat (ACQ-D), copper azole (CA), and chromated copper arsenate (CCA).
The chemicals that preserve the wood, primarily the inorganic waterborne preservative chromated copper arsenate (CCA), are designed to kill or repel biological organisms.
The checking of radiata pine which had been treated with a chromated copper arsenate preservative containing oil (7% or 14% w/w) or wax emulsion additive (2.5%) and exposed outdoors in Australia for 1 year was compared.