copper carbonate

copper carbonate

[′käp·ər ′kär·bə‚nāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Cu2(OH)2CO3 A toxic, green powder; decomposes at 200°C and is soluble in acids; used in pigments and pyrotechnics and as a fungicide and feed additive. Also known as artificial malachite; cupric carbonate; mineral green.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing the charge on copper from +1 in cuprite to +2 in copper carbonate yields a larger charge density and allows the ligands to be closer to a Cu+2 than to a Cu+1 ion center.
RESIDENTS have been assured that the public water supply is safe, after a chemical spill from a lorry on a main road in the Brecon Beacons Police and firefighters were called at 8.50am after around 500 litres of copper carbonate leaked from a parked container on the A470 near Storey Arms.
July 16 2010 -- UK food safety authorities have detected polychlorobifenyls (PCBs) in copper carbonate from Israel in a consignment of feed premix.
Southern pine sapwood wafers were treated with copper sulfate, copper acetate, and ammoniacal copper carbonate, all with 1 percent elemental copper in the waterborne solution, with and without 2 percent PVOH.
Serious mining to exploit the rich near-surface copper carbonate veins began shortly thereafter.
By 3000 BCE, they added red lead ([Pb.sub.3][O.sub.4]), malachite (basic copper carbonate), orpiment (arsenic trisulfide), charcoal, and red madder (from the root of the plant Rubia tinctorum).
This layer is now blue-green--the result of the metal reacting with water mid air to create copper carbonate. This naturally occurring coating protects the remaining copper underneath.
Greens were malachite--basic copper carbonate CuC[O.sub.3] x Cu[(OH).sub.2] (Nesse, 2000), verdigrisi--CuO x 2 Cu[(C[H.sub.3]C[O.sub.2]).sub.2] (Mayer, 1991), synthetic chrysocolla--hydrated copper silicate CuSi[O.sub.3] x 2[H.sub.2]O (Nesse, 2000), and terre verte--glauconite, a mixed silicate of potassium aluminum and iron, KMg(Fe,A1)[(Si[O.sub.3]).sub.6] x 3[H.sub.2]O (Nesse, 2000).
Hydrometallurgical plants use a variety of byproducts, including circuit board scrap and bimetallics, to make cupric oxide, copper sulfate and copper carbonate.
Using painstakingly careful analysis, Proust showed in 1799 that copper carbonate contained definite proportions, by weight, of copper, carbon, and oxygen, no matter how it was prepared in the laboratory or how it was isolated from nature.