copper sulfide


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copper sulfide

[′käp·ər ′səl‚fīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
CuS Black, monoclinic or hexagonal crystals that break down at 220°C; used in paints on ship bottoms to prevent fouling.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gunning 'I am not sure that this airborne survey could have delivered a more definitive anomaly and more compelling evidence for a large and coherent body of high-density copper sulfide related to variably magnetic iron oxide minerals at Ranoke.
Copper sulfide extraction topped 40 million tons, which was four percent more than the planned figure.
This corrosion occurs as small flakes of copper sulfide that can clog or damage the valves, regulators and other components in gas fixtures.
The zone of a large number of copper sulfide between purple-red sandstone and the light grey-greyish white sandstone represents the redox and acid-base transition zone.
Note that in Figure 3, any feature related with the formation of copper sulfide phase during the immersion of the CdS films in the cationic solution are not displayed, since the vibrational modes corresponding to the S-S bonds (intense peak at 465 [cm.sup.-1]) are not displayed, and this evidence confirms that any copper sulfide phase was formed during the immersion of the CdS films in the cationic solution (or its amount is below the detection limit) [38-40].
The Bonita property encompasses a district of historic copper, gold and iron workings, unified by a single, district-scale hydrothermal system with a large, mappable alteration footprint covering the entire property, within which copper sulfide and gold mineralisation has been sampled by VR over an area of about 4 x 5 kilometres.
Kyriacou, "Study of copper sulfide crystallization in PEO-SDS solutions," Langmuir, vol.
Covellite copper sulfide, as a member of the chalcogenides, has been used in photo thermal conversion [4], electrodes [5], nonlinear optical materials, solar controller, solar radiation absorber [6], catalyst [7], nanometer-scale switches and high-capacity cathode material in lithium secondary batteries [8], and sensors [9].
In these cases, the corrosion product (typically copper sulfide) creeps onto the solder mask surface and causes short circuits between adjacent pads and traces.
"When the ice melted on Wild-2, the resulting warm water dissolved minerals that were present at the time and precipitated the iron and copper sulfide minerals we observed in our study," says Lauretta.
She says that mining there would release copper sulfide, which is toxic to aquatic life at very low levels.