coprophagy

(redirected from coprophagous)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

coprophagy

[kə′präf·ə·jē]
(zoology)
Feeding on dung or excrement.
References in periodicals archive ?
This coprophagous (dung-feeding) beetle lives and nests only in the remains of the nests of the Mexican ant Atta mexicana (habitat rarity) and does not even occupy all of them, nor is it abundant, suggesting great demographic rarity.
Macrochelid mites have been recovered from the body surface of adult flies, as well as from coprophagous scarab beetles and even from some rodents (reviewed by Krantz 1983).
The use of trophic guilds/ functional guilds (necrophagous, saprophagous, coprophagous, tunnelers, dwellers and rollers) may also reveal interesting differences in the structure and functioning of ecosystems and landscape (Paoletti, 1999).
This is the case of Diptera saprophagous, coprophagous et necrophagous.
Notes on the seasonal dynamics of some coprophagous Scarabaeoidea (Coleoptera) species in Manisa province, western Anatolia.
Effects of the clearing in a tropical rain forest on the composition of coprophagous scarab beetles fauna (Coleoptera).
The larvae are probably coprophagous, as judged by a published observation of a female apparently laying eggs on a scarab dung ball (Emden 1941).
In the three surveyed areas 44,355 individuals of the coprophagous Scarabaeoidea were collected, represented by 54 species, being 52 of Scarabaeidae (44,221 individuals [99.69%]) in 19 genera and two subfamilies (Scarabaeinae and Aphodiinae), and two species of Coilodes Westwood (1845), with 134 individuals (0.31%) from Hybosorinae (Hybosoridae) (Table 1).
Eggs are ingested by the intermediate host (a variety of species of arthropods, mainly coprophagous beetles) and the larvae encyst within the tissues and develop to infectivity (L3) within two months.
Termites are coprophagous (Waller & LaFage 1987), but experimental data is lacking regarding the nutritional benefit termites receive from ingestion of their feces.