DNA

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DNA:

see nucleic acidnucleic acid,
any of a group of organic substances found in the chromosomes of living cells and viruses that play a central role in the storage and replication of hereditary information and in the expression of this information through protein synthesis.
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DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

See GENETICS.

DNA

(biochemistry)

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid; a nucleic acid that is the main constituent of the chromosomes of all organisms (except some viruses). The DNA molecule consists of two polynucleotide chains in the form of a double helix, containing phosphate and the sugar deoxyribose and linked by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA is self-replicating, plays a central role in protein synthesis, and is responsible for the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parents to offspring

DNA

(1) See Windows DNA.

(2) (Digital Network Architecture) Introduced in 1978, it was Digital's umbrella term for its enterprise network architecture based on DECnet.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the previously announced acquisition of a license from Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics for the production of their newly patented single copy DNA probes will enable Life Sciences to enter the growing cytogenetics market.
(5) Molecular biologists have been working on a nanoscale to manipulate genetic material from a variety of organisms (human, animal, insect, plant, bacteria, virus) for over 25 years, with the ability to isolate, cut, move, join, splice together, synthesize and copy DNA. (6) In terms of scale, to better understand nanotechnology, most mammalian cells are between 20,000-30,000 nanometres (nm) in size, with some exceptions like neurons (brain cells, spinal cord) that can reach lengths up to 1 metre.
The enzymes that copy DNA to RNA and vice versa can't tell the difference between the two components, but the subtle chemical tweak--akin to writing a letter in a hard-to-read, byzantine font--relays an entirely different meaning to the ribosome, the researchers suggest.
Meanwhile, PSNI Detective Inspector Sean Fitzpatrick said the police recovered seven spent cartridges from the living room and a low copy DNA was recovered from the cartridges.
Forensic scientists are examining cigarette butts, Joseph's buggy and clothing recovered from the scene and hope to "grow low copy DNA".