coquette

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coquette

any hummingbird of the genus Lophornis, esp the crested Brazilian species L. magnifica
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Baroque plays refer to the coquettishness and seductiveness with which women wielded their cloaks, simultaneously hiding and showing their desires.
The moralistic tales of her fourth brother's huqin music manage to subdue the coquettishness of her eyes and restrict the vibrant movement of which her supple physique is capable.
The model of the feminine masquerade is useful to understand Saint-Phalle's flirting and coquettishness. (29) Her masquerade, however, differs from Riviere's patient, for instead of the girlish, submissive attitude Riviere described, Saint-Phalle adopted an aggressively feminine stance--a masquerade of the femme-fatale.
Eternally youthful Imogen Stubbs swings between girlish coquettishness and motherly hand-wringing as Amanda, the abandoned wife despairing of her daughter's future.
"HmmmC*where shall we go next?" asked Donia between numbers, finger tapping her cheek in little-girl coquettishness. There was a roll of suggestions from the crowd.
Such practices also established the common arguments adversaries used to characterize women's personalities to dispute their fitness as administrators, namely, a "disagreeable nature" and "coquettishness." (71) Such negative character critiques portrayed women as emotional and lacking authority.
Bentall coloured this affectionate farewell to old colleagues with a neat touch of coquettishness that suggested she was probably quite happy to be leaving them.
She toys with the Whale Caller, manipulating him into an angry stalemate before turning to directness and gentle coquettishness. As always, she has the better of him when it comes to verbal fencing and scoring emotional points--a stereotypically gendered situation that constitutes one of the text's weak points.
Even items such as the coquettishness of the young wife come up for discussion in this regard--according to Kant, we can view the purpose of this behavior to lie in the need of the young woman to maintain ties permitting the acquisition of new husband should the old one pass on.
While the work's alternation between sensual and gruesomely violent depictions of children inevitably suggests certain unwholesome possibilities, there's little evidence that the artist significantly augmented the coquettishness inherent in the coloring-book and advertising images of the little girls he copied or pasted into his work.