ligament

(redirected from coracoclavicular ligament)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

ligament

(lĭg`əmənt), strong band of white fibrous connective tissueconnective tissue,
supportive tissue widely distributed in the body, characterized by large amounts of intercellular substance and relatively few cells. The intercellular material, or matrix, is produced by the cells and gives the tissue its particular character.
..... Click the link for more information.
 that joins bones to other bones or to cartilage in the joint areas. The bundles of collagenous fibers that form ligaments tend to be pliable but not elastic. They therefore permit freedom of movement within a certain limited range while holding the attached bones firmly in place. For example, the ligaments at the knee limit the movement of the lower leg to a certain range. Other types of ligaments form fibrous sheets that support such internal organs as the kidneys and the spleen.

Ligament

A strong, flexible connective tissue band usually found between two bony prominences. Most ligaments are composed of dense fibrous tissue formed by parallel bundles of collagen fibers. They have a shining white appearance and are pliable, strong, and noncompliant. A second kind of ligament, composed either partly or almost entirely of yellow elastic fibers, is extensible or compliant, thereby allowing the connected bones to move apart. See Connective tissue, Joint (anatomy)

Ligament

 

in man, a dense band or layer of fibrous tissue that connects skeletal bones or individual organs. Ligaments usually are found near joints and perform a variety of functions, depending on the movements in the joint. Joint capsules are strengthened by reinforcing ligaments, limited in their amplitude by inhibiting ligaments, and directed in their movements by directing ligaments. In many joints, ligaments act as passive bands whose attenuation impairs static functions and alters the shape of the corresponding elements of the skeleton. The main blood vessels that nourish bone pass through some ligaments. The microscopic structure of articular ligaments consists of a variety of dense fibrous tissue whose dominant elements are bands of collagenous and elastic fibers.

The term “ligament” is often applied to anatomic formations not associated with joints, for example, the ligaments of visceral organs, which consist of fine double layers of peritoneum.

ligament

[′lig·ə·mənt]
(engineering)
The section of solid material in a tube sheet or shell between adjacent holes.
(histology)
A flexible, dense white fibrous connective tissue joining, and sometimes encapsulating, the articular surfaces of bones.

ligament

Anatomy any one of the bands or sheets of tough fibrous connective tissue that restrict movement in joints, connect various bones or cartilages, support muscles, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Minor modifications in surgical technique might have occurred with passage of time as reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligament was a demanding procedure and we were relatively new to this technique.
In conclusion, we obtained favourable results in autograft technique of reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligament when compared to A.
When performing surgery for type 3 injuries, 69% recommended reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments.
Anatomy of the clavicle and coracoid process for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments.
In addition to the open technique, Lafosse and coworkers described an all-arthroscopic technique for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction by ligamentoplasty after acute or chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation.
The use of flip buttons in CC ligament reconstruction has been shown to reach the level of the native coracoclavicular ligament complex as it has been quantified in the literature.
Coracoid process fracture combined with acromioclavicular dislocation and coracoclavicular ligament rupture: a case report and review of the literature.
Superior displacement of the medial clavicular fracture fragment persisted and the distal clavicular nonunion was located distal to the insertion of the coracoclavicular ligaments (Neer type III fracture).
They occur distal to the coracoclavicular ligament and are classified further into 3 subtypes.
In AC injury types I and II, the acromioclavicular ligaments are sprained or torn, but the coracoclavicular ligaments are intact.
Initial radiographs revealed a displaced left distal clavicle fracture with no disruption to the coracoclavicular ligaments evident (Figure 1).
The coracoacromial ligament was left undisturbed and no attempt was made to repair the avulsed coracoclavicular ligaments.