coralline


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coralline

[′kär·ə‚lēn]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any animal that resembles coral, such as a bryozoan or hydroid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2004), which takes into account the convenience of studying dispersed coralline communities, at low depth, and with different topographic environmental conditions, such as those that exist on the east coast of the Pacific Ocean.
National award-winning journalist and author Julie Mcelwain endorsed the book saying, "The Oyster Thief is a wildly imaginative journey on land and in the ocean that will have you anxiously turning pages late into the night to discover the fate of Coralline and Izar—and the underwater world itself.
Coralline algae thrive globally in almost all coastal habitats where there is sufficient light and hard substrate to attach.
The animals appear to be patchily distributed in areas along the southern California mainland, and distribution may be correlated with substrate type (flat rock preferred over uneven), relief (low relief with scattered rock and boulders preferred over high relief), the presence of intermittent sand channels that may accumulate drift kelp, and algal composition in that Pelagophycus porra, Laminaria farlowii, Agarum fimbriatum, Pterygophora californica, and coralline algae (articulated and crustose) are often present in areas where pinto abalone occur (Bird unpublished data, Hagey et al.
Naturally occurring crustose coralline algae fringe the reefs, lending them a surreal orangey-red glow, and in deeper waters, sharks and schools of snappers and jacks swirl in the currents.
Researchers from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh and Glasgow University pumped water enriched with carbon dioxide into chambers placed over the coralline algal ecosystem and monitored the community's response before, during and after exposure.
Since its main composition is calcium carbonate, a hydrothermal technique was developed to completely convert the calcium carbonate to be coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) ceramics for clinical application [5-8].
franksi settlement assays, each experimental replicate contained 20 larvae placed in a 55-mm petri dish (~ 10-ml-volume seawater) with a small chip of the crustose coralline algae (CCA) Hydrolithon boergesenii (~1 [cm.sup.2]).
Coralline Blackwood is an exacting matriarch who wields the Bible as a weapon.
Most collections were taken from rocky intertidal regions along the Southern Caribbean coast by breaking fossil or living coralline rocks and removing polychaete specimens.