coralline algae


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coralline algae:

see RhodophytaRhodophyta
, phylum (division) of the kingdom Protista consisting of the photosynthetic organisms commonly known as red algae. Most of the world's seaweeds belong to this group.
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coralline algae

[′kär·ə‚lēn ′al·jē]
(botany)
Red algae belonging to the family Corallinaceae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The New Zealand abalone is among those invertebrate larvae that depend directly on the presence of crustose coralline algae. Commonly known as paua, it is a key coastal species, given its huge economical, ecological and cultural importance.
Morse (1990) presented evidence that abalone larvae require exogenous chemical induction for settlement and metamorphosis, and Morse and Morse (1984) suggested that settlement cues associated with crustose coralline algae are related specifically to certain chemicals produced by them and present only on their surfaces (Morse 1992).
Negri, "Crustose coralline algae and a cnidarian neuropeptide trigger larval settlement in two coral reef sponges," PLoS ONE, vol.
Luminaolide, a novel metamorphosis-enhancing macrodiolide for scleractinian coral larvae from crustose coralline algae. Tetrahedron Lett.
In the case of the 1982-83 El Nino, the recovery was limited by 1) the extreme oceanographic conditions of the region, 2) the high coral mortality suffered during the El Nino, 3) the intense herbivory resulting from high sea urchin concentrations produced high rates of bieorosion, 4) low abundance of recruits due to reduced sexual activity of the main reef builder species, and 5) low potential for successful recruitment due to the low abundance of crustose coralline algae (Guzman & Cortes 2001).
The following were identified with varying depth: Sponges, echinoderms, pelecypods, bivalves, coralline algae and foraminifera Globorotalia cerroazulensis.
Each transparency represented a 0.25 [m.sup.2] quadrat that was evaluated by projecting onto a grid containing 25 random points (modified point quadrat) and evaluated based on (1) Bare Substrate, (2) Cyanobacteria, (3) Green Algal Mat, (4) Red Algal Mat, (5) Coralline Algae, or (6) Live Coral coverage.
A tiny human backbone comes to mind, rather than a piece of coralline algae. Moving it gently with a forefinger, a person can discover that the jointed segments are quite flexible.
Similarly, their association with coralline algae, coral fragments, gymnocodiacean and udoteacean algae and echinoderms in the Cuautla Formation also indicates normal salinity (Flugel, 1982).
He says the discovery of rhodoliths in Alaska marks an important milestone in scientists' understanding of coralline algae.
Another good buy is Versace's Lips (pounds 15), a range of lipsticks containing Vitamin E and trehalose - which helps protect lips from dryness - and coralline algae which aims to help control skin ageing.