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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
DISCUSSION: These data support the existing evidence that umbilical cord care with chlorhexidine can reduce the incidence of omphalitis.
For each hospitalized or line listed case, we extracted the following attributes: age at onset of symptoms, age on admission, age at death, delay before admission, weight, sex, residence, duration of hospital stay, maternal immunization with at least two doses of tetanus toxoid (TT), antenatal care, place of delivery, delivery assistance and cord care. The outcome variable was mortality from NT.
4: CORD CARE PRACTICES BY THE DAI Instruments used to cut the cord Sterile blade 79(64.2) 87(68.5) Unsterile blade 5(3.9) 1(0.8) Sickle 2(1.6) 0(0.0) >0.05 Scissors 27(22.0) 31(24.4) Don't know 14(11.4) 4(3.1) Anything was applied to the cord stump No 49 (32.0) 77 (60.6) <0.05 Yes 101(67.0) 50 (39.4 If Yes, different kinds of applications Ghee 79(70.2) 22(44.0) <0.05 Neem paste 2(2.7) 1(2.0) Antiseptic lotion 20(27.0) 27(54.0) Table No.
A year later, the global health body issued a new guideline on umbilical cord care, formally recommending the use of CHX on newborns.Chlorhexidine, which comes in solution or gel form, is an effective antiseptic that provides bactericidal action for 24 hours after a two-minute application.
"Interestingly, one study does suggest that one-time cleansing with chlorhexidine reduces neonatal mortality when compared to dry cord care; however, most of the existing evidence suggests that antiseptic treatment does not offer a benefit over dry cord care," they wrote.
The absence of care in these areas has been identified as risk factor for increasing burden of neonatal mortality in the literature; cord care accounting for neonatal sepsis, prelacteal feed, perception about colostrum and late initiation of breastfeeding, bathing patterns accounting for hypothermia in neonates, and knowledge about skin to skin contact especially for preterm babies.
The study conducted in Addis Ababa health centers also indicated that level of essential newborn care practices were low even though the majority of respondents practice early initiation of breast feeding and safe cord care [12].
Cord care practices are often embedded in institutional tradition, however, few data were gathered in the past regarding the most effective method (14).
The World Health Organization recommends dry cord care (where nothing is placed on cord stump unless indicated).
Therefore, we recommended the following times of possible pathogen transmission to the neonate for handwashing with soap: after respiratory secretion contact, before umbilical cord care, before breastfeeding, and after fecal contact.