cord factor

cord factor

[′kȯrd ‚fak·tər]
(microbiology)
A toxic glycolipid found as a surface component of tubercle bacilli that is responsible for virulence and serpentine growth.
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Ziehl-Neelsen Staining was performed to detect Cord Factor and TBc ID was undertaken to detect MPT 64 protein.
Out of 100 MGIT positive samples 92 were positive for Cord factor and 08 were negative, whereas 89 samples were positive on MGIT TBc Identification Device and 11 were negative.
TDM is also known as "cord factor" as it facilitates cord formation, as well as increasing impermeability and resistance to: (i) many antibiotics, thus improving survival inside macrophages.8,9 MTB can be differentiated from Non-tuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) by the presence of cord factor because NTM is scattered or dispersed without any orientation.
The results of our study, (Graph) showed Rate of positivity for tuberculosis and its comparison of ZN smear, LJ culture, TBc ID and Cord Factor from all 100 MGIT positive samples.
Table-1: Diagnotic accuracy of ZN, cord factor, TBC ID.
MTB can be differentiated from Non-tuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) by the presence of cord factor which gives characteristic serpentine cord like appearance to MTB while NTM are scattered or dispersed without any orientation as NTM does not form a serpentine cord.
In the present study, TBc Identification Device and Cord Factor were used for the rapid species identification of MTB.
Cord formation in liquid media and fluid samples is a reliable and predictive marker for M tuberculosis, whereas nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to orient randomly.[1,2] The cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate) responsible for this morphological phenomenon contributes significantly to the virulence of M tuberculosis.[3] These toxic surface glycolipids evoke cytokine-related host weight loss and play a fundamental role in the genesis and persistence of granulomas.
Edakuni, "Post-laminoplasty palsy of upper extremities, with special reference to the spinal cord factors," Bessatsu Seikeigeka, vol.