cordage


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cordage

(kôr`dĭj), collective name for rope and other flexible lines. It is used for such purposes as wrapping, hauling, lifting, and power transmission. Early man used strips of hide, animal hair, and plant materials. Hemp and flax were formerly standard in Europe and America but were largely replaced in the 19th cent. by hard fibers, especially Manila hemp and sisal. In the 20th cent. the natural fibers were replaced in many applications by synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester. The fibers are straightened, usually by combing, then spun into yarn. Twine, which is sometimes called cord, is formed by wrapping two or more yarns together. By twisting together a number of yarns, a strand is formed. By twisting together three or more strands, a rope is produced. A cable-laid rope is formed from three or more ropes. In general a synthetic fiber rope lasts much longer and is much stronger than a natural fiber rope. Steel wire, often with a fiber core, is also used for rope.

cordage

[′kȯrd·ij]
(engineering)
Number of cords of lumber per given area.
(materials)
Ropes or cords, especially those in the rigging of a ship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial laboratory tests conducted by the Forest Products Research and Development Institute (FPRDI-DOST) revealed that the fibers of the new hybrids were not as strong as abaca and therefore will not do as well for cordage making.
Sisal was continually produced during the German and the British administrations and was the colony's largest export, highly prized for use in cordage and carpets worldwide.
Some of the common non-emergency uses for these blankets are but not limited to: water gathering, making a rain shelter, waterproofing, using it as a heat reflector and as cordage. These blankets are pocket-size and lightweight making it convenient to carry around or store in the car.
Making cordage is a fundamental survival skill that should not be overlooked.
It's really simple, and all you'll need is some rope or cordage.
(46) Nevertheless, before 1949, Niagara employers such as Plymouth Cordage, Atlas Steels, Joseph Stokes Rubber, Hayes Dana, Foster Wheeler, and McKinnon Columbus Chain, willingly collaborated with the CFL.
And of the bark, it is thin, tough, rubbery, and can be easily peeled for ornamenting basketry and making cordage.
Natural Fiber Cordage Workshop for Adults Explore the fibers found naturally in the woods.
market, offering competitive products such as flexible packaging, cordage, tableware, items for table or kitchen and more.