cord

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cord

1. string or thin rope made of several twisted strands
2. a length of woven or twisted strands of silk, etc., sewn on clothing or used as a belt
3. a ribbed fabric, esp corduroy
4. US and Canadian a flexible insulated electric cable, used esp to connect appliances to mains
5. Anatomy any part resembling a string or rope
6. a unit of volume for measuring cut wood, equal to 128 cubic feet
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cord

 

(1) A very strong twisted thread of cotton or chemical fiber used in the rubber industry for the manufacture of textile products that serve as semifinished components of rubber goods (such as tires).

(2) A woolen fabric, characterized by a special type of weave that forms longitudinal grooves (3–8 mm wide) along its face. Depending on its strength and thickness, cord is used in the manufacture of dresses, suits, and coats. The heaviest and most durable cord serves as excellent material for automobile upholstery.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a cord?

Sometimes restriction, but, alternatively, the bonds we have with others. The umbilical cord indicates dependency, and in those kinds of situations we talk about “cutting the cord.”

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

cord

[kȯrd]
(electricity)
A small, very flexible insulated cable.
(materials)
A unit of measure for wood stacked for fuel or pulp; equals 4 × 4 × 8, or 128 cubic feet (approximately 3.6246 cubic meters).
A long, flexible, cylindrical construction of natural or synthetic fibers twisted or woven together.
Strands of material forming the plies in a motor vehicle tire.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

electric cord

One or more flexible insulated electric conductors in a flexible insulating covering which is equipped with terminals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Corder's Cinderella launched the newlook Liverpool Empire in October 1998 following the theatre's pounds 10 million refit and was a smashing success.
Part II is called "Theory-building and critiquing Corderian rhetoric." It presents an overview of Corder's work.
Prof Corder's theory has caused quite a stir and they think, as you can well imagine, that he's the bee's knees.
'Nilfisk spends more than three per cent of its annual revenue on research and development, employing 250 engineers and specialists to create intelligent cleaning products that address our customer's needs today and for tomorrow,' says Corder.
Ms Corder added: "The provision as it stands is for 136 and we never thought that would be enough.
The new shows sees Corder returning to the 80-year-old score as the sole inspiration for his classically based work.
Corder, a professor at the William Harvey Research Institute in London, draws on more than 30 years of scientific studies which have found that, for example, people who drank two to four glasses of red wine a day reduced the risk of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia to about a quarter of the rate of non-drinkers.
The silver cam corder was stolen, along with a mobile phone and a set of keys, from the house in Bryntiron Avenue, Rhyl, last Tuesday night.
In the seventh, Eddie Kim walked with two outs before Corder hit a homer to right off reliever Dirk Hayhurst to put the Canadians ahead 6-4.
Economic researchers Professor Andrew Oswald and Matthew Corder looked at data from DVLA auctions of 2,748 personalised number plates.
His analysis, with researcher Matthew Corder, shows that motorists would pay more to have their name on a registration plate.
EO Corder Inc., led by Edwin Corder, acquired the storefront at 2611 Kavanaugh Blvd.