cordate

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cordate

heart-shaped

cordate

[′kȯr‚dāt]
(botany)
Heart-shaped; generally refers to a leaf base.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of the Greenwich meridian--agreed as the world prime meridian from 1884--and the decision to centre the cordiform projection map on London may symbolise the fact that the city was considered to be the heartbeat of the British Empire.
Slightly broader than long, sides entire, subrounded, hind angles broadly acute, disc slightly convex, strongly bisinuate basally, dense but deep punctures on disc, scattered recumbent pubescence; Scutellum cordiform, medially depressed, pit-like; elytral shoulders slightly broader than base of pronotum, parallel to apex, strial margins with distinct groove, interstriae with fine puncture, very dense pubescence on the entire elytra, 1st elytral interval at the apex of the elytra carinate.
1), gavialiform reptiles with cordiform skulls, long rostra, and short necks.
A geographer and historian and the cartographer to King Philip II of Spain, Ortelius is thought to have been a member of a clandestine, non-partisan religious sect, the Family of Love, that used a cordiform projection map of the world as a uniting symbol or badge of recognition.
In this short paper I wish to introduce you to one such case, that of cordiform maps of the sixteenth century (cordiform simply means heart-shaped, using the Latin cor for heart).
gracile spatulate [female][male] spatulate-cordiform cordiform, to cordiform-reniform with with hairs, abundant marginal hairs (50-80) (20-35) B.
Schoner's interpretation was adopted by his many followers, among them Oronce Fine, whose single cordiform world map of 1534-6 also shows the islands as a binary group in the same latitude but now under the name insule deserti (uninhabited islands).
1511 Sylvanus, Bernard cordiform world map in 2 colours.
His lost terrestrial globe made prior to 1526 is said to have influenced Oronce Fine's double cordiform (heart-shaped) world map of 1531.
The work develops from intuitions about Australia from its personification as Magellanica on the title-page of Ortelius's Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570), a peninsula ("Regio Patalis") jutting north from Antarctica named as "Terra Australis" on the right panel of Oronce Fine's double cordiform world-map of 1531 (tipped into Gryneaus's Novus orbis), and accounts from both Antonio Pigafetta and earlier Portuguese explorers known to have passed by the land that James Cook officially discovered in his voyage of 1772-1775.