coresident


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coresident

[kō′rez·ə·dənt]
(computer science)
A computer program or program module that is stored in a computer memory along with other programs.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When resources and parenting responsibilities were included (model 2), married or cohabiting respondents living with no parent or just one had 73% lower odds of graduating than single respondents living with two parents; they also had lower odds than married or cohabiting respondents with two coresident parents (not shown).
We treat a number of time-varying inputs to the child outcome production process as endogenous to the parents: mother's daily work hours in her current paying job (MOMWKHRS); her daily number of cigarettes smoked (CIGARETTES); enrollment of the subject child in a private or religious school (PRIVSC) or in a public school (PUBSC); the child's age (AGECH), conditioned by whether or not the child ever attended Head Start (HSEVER); and annual household income (INCOME) per number of coresident children (NUMCHILD) age 18 or under.
one resident's consent when another physically present coresident
Single fathers are slightly older than single mothers, have slightly fewer coresident children, and have a greater number of coresident adults in their households.
Memorials typically included the applicant's name, British address, occupation, age, birthplace and nationality, as well as the nationality of the applicant's parents, the applicant's marital status, names and ages of underage coresident children and sometimes spouses, addresses of residences in Britain for at least five of the previous eight years, and reasons for seeking naturalization.
Women having experienced demographic events by their 25th birthday, two cohorts at 10-year distance: estimates from the FFS Country Cohorts Have left Have entered Have become parental a coresident mothers home union Austria 1956-61 86.1 74.8 52.5 1966-71 83.0 70.2 43.4 Belgium (a) 1951-56 89.3 86.1 47.1 1961-66 82.3 75.7 26.3 Bulgaria 1958-62 n.a.
Slightly more than one-half of the grandparent caregivers were living in skipped-generation households in which neither the grandchild's parent nor others of the grandparent's children (for example, middle-generation members) were coresident. The majority of coresident middle-generation members were adults.
Building on this research, our focus is a detailed analysis of ethnocultural and family-related factors in the formation of coresident intergenerational households in North America (e.g., Boyd, 2000; Goldscheider & Goldscheider, 1999).
Utilization of formal services was less likely for elderly people with coresident caregivers regardless of their relationships status, than for elderly people living alone (Tennstedt et al., 1993).
In 2000, the data showed that coresident grandparents who were under age 60 were more likely to be responsible for their grandchildren (50 percent) than coresident grandparents who were aged 60 and over (31 percent).
Census 2000 long form about coresident grandparents, focusing on data from people over age 29 years.