Corn Bunting

(redirected from corn buntings)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Corn Bunting

 

(Emberiza calandra), a bird of the family Emberizidae of the order Passeriformes. The body is 18–20 cm long and weighs approximately 50 g. The plumage is brownish above and whitish with dark longitudinal stripes below. The corn bunting is distributed in Europe, North Africa, and the southern part of Western Asia. In the USSR its range extends from southern Byelorussia to southeastern Kazakhstan. The bird inhabits fields, meadows, and mountain steppes with tall weeds and shrubs. It nests on the ground, laying four to six eggs in a clutch. The female incubates the eggs for 12 or 13 days. Two clutches may be produced per summer. The corn bunting feeds on seeds and insects.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Defra only has to tweak ELS a little to ensure a recovery in farmland birds such as skylarks and corn buntings.
Bird life is being destroyed - 95 per cent of tree sparrows have died out, 85 per cent of corn buntings, 70 per cent of turtle doves and 52 per cent of skylarks.
Conversely, the bird species that have undergone the most serious population declines in the UK, such as skylarks and corn buntings, rarely encounter cats.
And species we have sadly lost could feature too, such as turtle doves and corn buntings.
RSPB's Yorkshire spokesman Chris Thomson said: "In Yorkshire, endangered species such as corn buntings, black grouse, curlews and tree sparrows would slip even further into decline without HLS funding to secure their management.
Since then I've occasionally tried to reproduce the song of a corn bunting by rattling my keys, with no great effect - I just look silly and the corn buntings just look offended, before flying off uttering irritated "tic tic" calls of reproach.
It found that throughout the Midlands during the past 25 years, numbers of skylarks and corn buntings have dropped by 75percent and song thrushes by 66percent.
SOME of Britain's most common countryside birds - including song thrushes, grey partridges and corn buntings - have fallen to their lowest recorded numbers.
Farms which already have populations of under-threat farmland birds such as lapwings, grey partridge or corn buntings tend to be among the priorities when applying for some schemes.
The MONARCH report predicts that new areas of the UK will become suitable for stone-curlews, corn buntings and turtle doves.
The best data available is on bird species, showing a drop in the numbers of skylarks and corn buntings, which also reflects a decline in the quality of plant and insect life which the birds feed upon.