carnelian

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carnelian

(kärnēl`yən) or

cornelian

(kôr–, kər–), variety of red chalcedonychalcedony
[from Chalcedon], form of quartz the crystals of which are so minute that its crystalline structure cannot be seen except with the aid of a microscope. Chalcedony has a waxy luster and is translucent to transparent.
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, used as a gem. It is distinguished from sard by the shade of red, carnelian being bright red and sard brownish. The red coloring is apparently caused by iron oxide.

Carnelian

 

a variety of the mineral chalcedony with a reddish yellow or red color caused by admixtures of ferric oxide. Varieties of agate consisting of alternating layers of bright red or reddish yellow and milky white coloring are called sardonyx. Carnelian and sardonyx are valuable and widespread decorative stones. They are used for making beads and as stones to be set in rings, brooches, and decorative boxes. Cut insets made of carnelian and sardonyx (cameos and gems) and small cut bottles and snuff boxes made of carnelian are highly valued.

carnelian

brings luck; drives away evil. [Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 62–63]

carnelian

symbol of St. Sebastian. [Christian Hagiog.: Brewer Handbook, I, 411]

carnelian

a red or reddish-yellow translucent variety of chalcedony, used as a gemstone
References in periodicals archive ?
A product of Florence's Grand Ducal Workshops, and probably designed by Bernardino Poccetti, the top incorporates a range of costly and gloriously hued stones, from agates, amethysts, chalcedonies, cornelians and jaspers to lapis lazuli.
And then the sarcophagus - solid gold and encrusted with lapis lazzuli, tourguoise and cornelians and bearing the haunting image of an 18-year-old who ruled one of the world's greatest civilizations.
Days before their divorce--handled for him by Wilfrid Evill, with payment in art--he had written: 'I think that even while now we are in the middle of this legal fight that away in our real selves we continue to be utterly at one, rejoicing in our oneness.' Afterwards he was convinced that if only they could get back to Suffolk, to the very bedroom of their honeymoon, to the beach at Southwold where they had searched for cornelians, all would be well again.