cornice

(redirected from cornices)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

cornice

(kôr`nĭs), molded or decorated projection that forms the crowning feature at the top of a building wall or other architectural element; specifically, the uppermost of the three principal members of the classic entablatureentablature
, the entire unit of horizontal members above the columns or pilasters in classical architecture—Greek, Roman or Renaissance. The height of the entablature in relation to the column supporting it varies with the three orders, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian, but
..... Click the link for more information.
, hence by extension any similar crowning and projecting element in the decorative arts. The term is also employed for any projection on a wall that is provided to throw rainwater off the face of the building. The cornice undoubtedly had its origin in the primitive eave projection: the Greek Doric and lonic cornices recall early wooden roof forms, and the Egyptian cavetto-and-fillet cornice is a derivation of the overhanging papyrus stalks that formed the eaves of primitive shelters. The cornice early lost its structural significance and became a stylized decorative element; in the Greek and Roman eras it assumed firmly standardized forms in the classical orders that were retained, with variations, through the Renaissance and later periods. As an element in the classical entablature the cornice is composed of the cymatium, or crown molding, above the corona, the projecting flat member, which casts the principal shadow; in this shadow, and supporting the corona, are a group of moldings called the bed molds, which may be elaborated with dentils. The Corinthian and Composite cornices are further embellished with modillions, or brackets, under the corona; the soffit of the Doric corona is decorated with square, flat projections called mutules, having guttae, or small knobs, hanging from their lower surfaces.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Cornice

The uppermost division of an entablature; a projecting shelf along the top of a wall supported by a series of brackets; the exterior trim at the meeting of a roof and wall, consisting of soffit, fascia and crown molding.

boxed cornice

A hollow cornice, built up of boards and moldings, resulting in a soffit under the eaves.

bracketed cornice

A deep cornice having large, widely spaced ornamental brackets supporting an overhanging eave; it is common in the Italianate style.

horizontal cornice

The level cornice of the pediment under the two inclined cornices.

modillion cornice

A cornice supported by a series of modillions, often found in Composite and Corinthian orders.

open cornice

Overhanging eaves where the rafters are exposed at the eaves and can be seen from below.

raking cornice

A cornice following the slope of a gable, pediment, or roof.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

cornice

[′kȯr·nəs]
(architecture)
The crowning, overhanging part of an architectural structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cornice

cornice
1. Any molded projection which crowns or finishes the part to which it is affixed.
2. The third or uppermost division of an entablature, resting on the frieze.
3. An ornamental molding, usually of wood or plaster, running round the walls of a room just below the ceiling; a crown molding; the molding forming the top member of a door or window frame.
4. The exterior trim of a structure at the meeting of the roof and wall; usually consists of bed molding, soffit, fascia, and crown molding. For special types, see architrave cornice, boxed cornice, bracketed cornice, cavetto cornice, closed cornice, eaves cornice, modillion cornice, open cornice.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cornice

1. Architect
a. the top projecting mouldings of an entablature
b. a continuous horizontal projecting course or moulding at the top of a wall, building, etc.
2. an overhanging ledge of snow formed by the wind on the edge of a mountain ridge, cliff, or corrie
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"In addition to the extensive cast iron, there is sheet metal ornamentation on the facade, on elements such as the cornices. All renovation work was performed from pipe scaffolding."
There is a front reception room with bay window, attractive stained timber fireplace surround with cast iron inset and gas fire, shaped ceiling cornice, deep skirting boards and stained timber flooring.
Cornices and pelmets are designed as a finishing touch to wall cabinets, disguising joints and providing a flawless bridge between frontals and carcasses.
GRAND DESIGN The detached Victorian villa exudes the airiness and period charm associated with the time, including fireplaces and cornices
From the pillar-flanked front entrance, the front hall affords a prestigious reception, with ornate cornices, a magnificent original fireplace and parquet flooring.
What's the deal: If period features are your thing,this house has an abundance of them,including high skirtings,decorative cornices and polished,panelled doors.The decor throughout is tastefully neutral and would suit a buyer looking to move straight in and do minimal work on their purchase.
Working in the classical tradition, Van Doren's distinctive drawings are drawn from twenty years of his career and document him as an accomplished colorist with a particular affinity for architectural elements such as domes, corbels, caryatids, bays, oriels, cornices, medallions, entablatures, pediments, and other aspects of architectural distinction, shape and texture.
A range of fifty stock designs of cornices are available, from simple cove patterns to the prestigious Adam Collection - which will add a stylish finishing touch to any room.
A lightweight single-layered screen was therefore face-fixed to the Vaudoyer building, yielding to the existing architectural detail by being cut around cornices and door heads, while a more solid screen envelopes Lahalle's building, including the three-tier mansard rood.
Though it was covered with rotting sheets of plywood, the facade of the building had once boasted one of the most elaborate metal cornices in the town.
Window cornices are a simple, inexpensive way to dramatically enhance any room.