bypass

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Related to coronary bypass: Cardiac catheterization

bypass

1. a main road built to avoid a city or other congested area
2. any system of pipes or conduits for redirecting the flow of a liquid
3. a means of redirecting the flow of a substance around an appliance through which it would otherwise pass
4. Surgery
a. the redirection of blood flow, either to avoid a diseased blood vessel or in order to perform heart surgery
b. (as modifier): bypass surgery
5. Electronics
a. an electrical circuit, esp one containing a capacitor, connected in parallel around one or more components, providing an alternative path for certain frequencies
b. (as modifier): a bypass capacitor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bypass

[′bī‚pas]
(civil engineering)
A road which carries traffic around a congested district or temporary obstruction.
(communications)
The use of alternative systems, such as satellite and microwave, to transmit data and voice signals, avoiding use of the communication lines of the local telephone company.
(electricity)
A shunt path around some element or elements of a circuit.
(engineering)
An alternating, usually smaller, diversionary flow path in a fluid dynamic system to avoid some device, fixture, or obstruction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bypass

Any device (such as a pipe or duct) for directing flow around an element instead of through it.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bypass

In communications, to avoid the local telephone company by using satellites and microwave systems.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study was retrospective, the patients with concomitant valve replacement, ventricular aneurysmectomy redo coronary bypass or other cardiac or ascending aortic procedures were excluded from this analysis.
(2004) Validation of intracoronary shunt flow measurements for off-pump coronary bypass operations.
This is in accordance with the increased incidence of males undergoing coronary bypass surgery in Pakistan.11 The age distribution had a wide range of 29 to 74 years, the mean age being 48 +- 9.4 years.
Only 5.9 percent of those getting coronary bypass surgery did.
The survey scored hospitals in key performance areas such as risk-adjusted medical mortality, risk-adjusted surgical mortality, risk-adjusted complications, measures that assess process of care, percentage of coronary bypass patients with internal mammary artery use, procedure volume, severity-adjusted average length of stay, and wage- and severity-adjusted average cost.
Optimal medical therapy for patients with diabetes and stable coronary heart disease is equally effective at lowering the risk of death, heart attack, and stroke as prompt revascularization procedures with either coronary bypass surgery or angioplasty, according to results from an international multicenter clinical trial supported by the National Institutes of Health.
Blood vessels that have been tissue-engineered from bone marrow adult stem cells may in the future serve as a patient's own source of new blood vessels following a coronary bypass or other procedures that require vessel replacement, according to research from the University at Buffalo (N.Y.).
MUNICH -- Patients with diabetes who received coronary stents fared just as well as similar patients who underwent coronary bypass surgery in a randomized study.
Q: I had coronary bypass surgery late last year and recently have been having visual hallucinations.
Medical care costs and quality of life after randomization to coronary angioplasty or coronary bypass surgery.
Researchers from France analysed data from six trials involving almost 3,600 patients, all of whom had had atrial fibrillation in the past or had a high risk of developing new atrial fibrillation following a heart attack or coronary bypass surgery.
More than half of the patients had already undergone coronary bypass surgery, while others had undergone coronary angioplasty to improve blood flow to the heart.