corporal

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corporal

1
1. a noncommissioned officer junior to a sergeant in the army, air force, or marines
2. (in the Royal Navy) a petty officer who assists the master-at-arms

corporal

2, corporale
a white linen cloth on which the bread and wine are placed during the Eucharist

Corporal

 

military rank of noncommissioned officers in various foreign armies (the US, Great Britain, France, Italy, and others). In the Russian Army, the rank of corporal is referred to as early as 1647; it was officially introduced by the Military Regulations of Peter I. In the first half of the 19th century it was replaced by the military rank of noncommissioned officer.

References in periodicals archive ?
Making sense of toxic corporality and permeability in Agbogbloshie calls for going "beyond the body proper" (Lock and Farquhar, 2007), an anthropological perspective on the body that encourages discussion of "a lively carnality suffused with words, images, senses, desires, and powers" (Farquhar and Lock, 2007:15).
One of the ways to protect the statute of the body is the symbolic shaping of corporality. Due to its finitude, the body is associated to a symbolic communication system aimed at diminishing the anguish prior to the inevitable end.
(7) Both adolescents and young adults with spinal cord injuries experiment changes in their body and corporality that cause dependence from other people, equipment and other additions, which transforms their self-image due to the consequences of their lesions.
From his early work to his final letters, death is a presence as apparent in Keats's writing as in his biography, but the brief career also may be read as a continual affirmation of human presence by way of its embrace of absence and human scale seen in the writing's corporality. Despite the magnitude of death's enigmatic force, this poetry (and indeed correspondence) precipitates the figure of the person.
This brief murderous union between killers and victim suggests the complexity of performative, corporeal iconic identity: these new wounds on Coriolanus' body bear the significance of enemy to the Volsces, but this significance is inseparable from his physical actuality or corporality; his body is not simply a sign, but a thing to be assailed and extinguished.
A third is Norbert Elias, theoretician of an early modern "civilizing process" that slowly smothered carnival and all other medieval spontaneity, chaos, and easy corporality. Biow's exemplary masters are by now classics, their great work some decades back.
In chapter 2, by assessing the complex corporality of documents and bodies in Dickens's Bleak House, Hack develops an account of the extraordinary fashion in which Dickens's vehement defense of spontaneous combustion bled over, unexpectedly, into the advertisements that appeared with the novel's serial installments.
On the one hand, formal scarcity stems from God's creation: It is the human natural need to allocate time and resources due to human corporality and temporality.
They refer to the struggle both in feminist criticism and in the so-called "science wars" over the constitution and significance of materiality (particularity corporality for feminists) and the way of truth (especially for traditional scientists).
(3) The "corporality" that I discuss here does not refer to the "corporeality" that is more recognizable to readers familiar with Epicurean philosophy and Lucretian discussions of the union of the body and the soul.
the mere corporality but the vitality of men that books can be said to
Taking her cue from Max Nordau, Klee ties decadence to corporality. As a result, her analysis of the assimilation of nineteenth-century medical discourses into French and English fin-de-siecle literature principally focuses on the reappearance of the dandy in decadent literature.