corporal

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corporal

1
1. a noncommissioned officer junior to a sergeant in the army, air force, or marines
2. (in the Royal Navy) a petty officer who assists the master-at-arms

corporal

2, corporale
a white linen cloth on which the bread and wine are placed during the Eucharist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Corporal

 

military rank of noncommissioned officers in various foreign armies (the US, Great Britain, France, Italy, and others). In the Russian Army, the rank of corporal is referred to as early as 1647; it was officially introduced by the Military Regulations of Peter I. In the first half of the 19th century it was replaced by the military rank of noncommissioned officer.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(73) The association of corporal punishment with stress continues into adolescence, with ten- to sixteen-year-olds reporting more psychological distress the more frequently they report being corporally punished.
Again, this echoes letters in which the village elder was chastised for corporally punishing women, and told to look for outside evidence, or to outside institutions, to support his decisions.
In its first manifestations, honor was a concept or ideal that was reserved for those of noble birth or something that was passed on only through blood or wealth, but as time went on it came to mean something dealing with a person's soul or spirit; therefore by dishonoring someone, a person had corporally harmed another even if the insult was not physical.
One obvious term of comparison is with the reconstructive "near documentary" aesthetic of Jeff Wall, but even more telling, I think, is the contrast between Delahaye's panoramic pictures and the work of Andreas Gursky, whose large-scale and often fantastically detailed images put a similar premium on sheer visibility while simultaneously cutting themselves off, "severing" themselves, from any corporally imaginable relation to photographer or viewer: Distance in Gursky tends to be absolute, not, as in Delahaye, the dialectical other to proximity and immersion.
To me, the most important aspect of this whole experience was this: that no matter what the fifteen of us--professors from around the country and from diverse disciplines--were doing, whether we were corporally experiencing the disorientation of not knowing, gleefully finding out for ourselves plunged up to the elbows in Everglades water, or deliberately analyzing our own self-awareness as learners, all of us, at every stage, were passionately thinking about how we could carry this pedagogy back into our own classrooms, how we could energize our students as much as we were being energized.
She and other women are locked in the factory, worked to the point of exhaustion and punished corporally. Bare heads and cross-dressing are both taboo in post-revolution Iran, making this an Iranian Boys Don't Cry.
Human beings are embodied creations that will live forever corporally transformed.
(122) Since corporally punishing children "intentionally inflicts or attempts to inflict bodily harm" or "cause fear ...
If she is Mary, love is a fertilizing Holy Ghost whom she receives figuratively and corporally as implied in the interchange of heart and womb in Rime 2.
After being punished, generally corporally, one said one's penance and was then forgiven.
The couple's vital discourse of domesticity contributes to Sancho's managing not only to survive but to prosper, through his capacity to adapt verbally and corporally. Teresa and Sancho's metaphoric space of matrimony has an explicit influence in bringing both Sancho and Don Quijote back to their respective homes, and Sancho, on the one hand, specifically returns in order to continue in metaphoric and dialogic movement within what Don Quijote had described as the "viaje largo" of matrimony (II, 19; 784).