corporatism


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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
What may be the worst cost by far, however, is that corporatism may cost the economy a great deal of its potential dynamism.
As a result, certain government roles are strengthened in spite of the above-mentioned privatisations and corporatism. A reintroduction of tariffs will hinder international commerce.
The link between changes in corporatism, changes in the news media and the rise of a PR industry can also be seen in the case of Norway (Allern 2011, 2015).
Onder holds the opinion that authoritarian corporatism was implemented.
There have been few studies of state corporatism in Korea, and the state-corporatist features of the authoritarian developmental state were largely neglected by the literature on Korea's political economy.
Corporatism, where the state is free to take whatever measures it chooses for the sake of solidarity and protection, is a late-19th century Western European criticism of the modern economy.
This assumption, expressed repeatedly throughout the book, is at odds with the presented facts of resilient corporatism accompanied by a significant weakening of organized labour since German unification.
Nader winningly groups problems under the labels of "corporatism" and "corporate/statism." He praises principled conservatives and libertarians, and points out how "conservatism" is often abused and twisted to serve the powerful.
Corporatism here does not refer to an incorporated business; rather, it is economic behavior directed by the state or by stakeholders other than the firms or consumers.