corporatism


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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kristensen (2004), who has done one of the few studies on the development of PR in Denmark, does not specifically link the rise of PR to the decline in corporatism, but focuses on the professionalisation of communication.
The author grounds her analysis on a case study of one of Turkey's main confederations, TURK-IS (Confederation of Turkish Trade Unions) and provides a few proofs typical of authoritarian corporatism.
We then discuss state corporatism of the Korean developmental state and the neoliberal reforms implemented after the financial crisis of 1997.
Lastly, Phelps observes a disturbing increase in corporatism between the state and business, that is, a "parallel economy" of political influencers seeking company advantage and actively repressing market competition and innovation.
Corporatism as we experience it, in Phelps' telling, owes more to the continental European intellectual strands that came together in Benito Mussolini's syndicalism.
Along the same lines, Nader in Unstoppable repeatedly praises the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) as a scrappy opponent of corporatism.
Corporatism revealed itself recently in a small tuft of wheat that wouldn't die.
But conservatives would do best to put less weight on which corporatist party prevails in November and take aim instead at the philosophy of corporatism itself.
This system, however, is not capitalism, but rather an economic order that harks back to Bismarck in the late nineteenth century and Mussolini in the twentieth: corporatism.
The institutional variables included in our study are: employment protection legislation (EPL), EPL for temporary (EPLT) and for regular contracts (EPLR), the relative difference between EPLR and EPLT, trade union density, product market regulation (PMR), tax wedge, degree of corporatism, average unemployment benefit replacement rate (UBRR) and spending on active labour market programmes (ALMPs).
Unfortunately, Tunisia and Egypt will face serious hazards as they rely on democratic forces and mechanisms to mitigate the oppressive features of the rightist corporatism under which they suffered.
Countries with extensive labor market corporatism are often skill-specific economies (employers become more favorable towards the provision of social protection).