corporatism

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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
If a little less competition is the price regulators pay for much better control, well, that's a price politicians are willing to pay." Phelps presents a similar sentiment when he states, "We know that corporatist governments find it more convenient to deal with an industry populated by a few giant corporations than one with a great many small enterprises" (2013, 255).
The concept of what a corporatist nation is becomes somewhat liquid at times.
The democratic corporatist media model is based on the Nordic media market as it developed in the second half of the 20th century with a very high circulation of written press, a strong connection of the latter with political parties and other organized groups, and high levels of journalistic professionalism and institutionalized self-regulation, as well as a high level of state involvement in the media in the form of financial support to the press and a robust public broadcasting system.
First, citizen suits forced the state to legislatively abandon the official corporatist and development-only focus of state forestry laws.
The corporatist model may even be said to resemble, in spite of its differing and distant historical context, the social vision of the Catholic monarchs of the colonial period.
The persistence of corporatist arrangements has led to pervasive government-business collusion and regulatory capture.
Tell that to the Koch brothers and other corporatists who spend millions to influence every election.
His focus on the philosophic underpinnings of the modern economy, even though he believes it is now restrained by corporatist ideology, is a clarion call to leaders of less-dynamic Western economies.
He makes no secret about his corporatist leanings, which he presents as an alternative to the allegedly more adversarial industrial relations systems in the United States.
At its best, Unstoppable is a wonkish rallying cry for a much needed left-right convergence against the corrupt corporatist center.
In Phelps' telling, there is a pronounced conflict between a "modern capitalist" economy and a "corporatist" economy.
They argue, correctly, that Cardenas's most important legacy was his establishment of a vertical corporatist structure that tied most of Mexico's major economic and social sectors to the ruling party through patronage networks.