corporatism

(redirected from corporatists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
Cole, Britain's leading guild socialist, helped the miners develop their plan for nationalization, believing that it might serve as a pragmatic first step in a broader campaign to implement the corporatist ideals of guild socialism .
Such language clearly reflected corporatist assumptions about the possibility of creating a new industrial system based on the principles of cooperation and functional integration.
The key is that corporatists will support LGBT organizations as long as they are one-issue organizations.
His focus on the philosophic underpinnings of the modern economy, even though he believes it is now restrained by corporatist ideology, is a clarion call to leaders of less-dynamic Western economies.
Whereas the definition of modern capitalism may be well known and understood, the "corporatist" economy is probably less familiar in definition--although easily recognized in practice.
rested on an alliance of New Deal corporatists and antitrusters.
The NRA's leaders were committed corporatists who sought to replace what was seen as an individualistic, selfish, hyper-competitive system with a system built around concerted activity under government supervision.
The technical aspirations of early fascism (e.g., technical councils), as Gregor underscores, were never minimally realized, much to the dismay of Bottai and Ugo Spirito, who both conceded that the new corporatist order was effectively stillborn.
A majoritarian faction of corporatist Republicans and Democrats have aggressively combined to usher through many of corporate America's top legislative priorities.
For one thing, the globalists are actually global corporatists. They want corporations to run the show, to go anywhere to make profits, and leave everyone else to pick over the bones.
The costs of corporatism are visible all around us: dysfunctional corporations that survive despite their gross inability to serve their customers; sclerotic economies with slow output growth, a dearth of engaging work, scant opportunities for young people; governments bankrupted by their efforts to palliate these problems; and increasing concentration of wealth in the hands of those connected enough to be on the right side of the corporatist deal.
The corporatist form involves policy-making linkage between the state (provincial government) and economic producer groups.(16) The groups are brought into policy making to serve as agents of mass mobilization for state policy.