corporeal

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corporeal

of the nature of the physical body; not spiritual
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The movements of The Merro Tree, both corporeally artistic and boldly political, offer the reader a metaphor for human agency that is rooted in historical contexts whilst simultaneously meeting the challenges of present and future political contexts.
Othello, then, has attacked her entire identity, both social and physical, conceived of corporeally as her blood.
Prison was becoming a grim and lonely--perhaps less corporeally abusive, but more soul-destroying--business.
Rather, they make and are part of environments, imply movement and are experienced corporeally. These works offer us a way to understand the invisible architectures of what we refer to as 'emplaced visuality', and camera phone photography is part of the way that human subjects, images and socialities become emplaced in relation to these emergent structures and the corporate interests that drive them (see Lapenta, 2011; Farman, 2010).
Bigger thinks that by killing Bessie (whom he has already tried to corporeally equate with Mary), he has achieved the freedom he previously imagined existing only in the movie theater.
Unlike them, though, it relies on the somatic aspect of its language to affect its readers in a manner that enables them to relate corporeally to it.
Even if the war as conducted in heaven itself is thought of as not truly physical, it can still become that way as cosmic forces manifest corporeally to carry out their struggle in our world.
One can then claim that the historical field is recognized by the interchanging functions as analogous to one another, capable of filling in one another, and equally by the facts as systems, not revealing essentialities, as was shown at the outset, but various analogical interconnections, recognizable corporeally. This allows an archeologist, a historian, and an anthropologist to reconstruct the so-called past on the basis of some handy find.
Having never met a metaphor that he did not wish to literalize, he equates the "Fore-skinne" of the poet's "phansie" with the poet's own foreskin, and suggests that Donne's passionately erotic verses have "evoked an answering passion in Browne: a poetic, textualized, d passion to have Donne and to have all of Donne, a passion corporeally figured through the image of a complete full-length, uncircumcised 'phansie' that stands so prominently in the middle of the first stanza" (44).
Unlike them, Marzec shows at the end of his study, Salman Rushdie writes his fiction from this postcolonial occasion, when this spectral relay of negatives, all manifestations of the "presence of the local, nondiscursive earth," (163) comes to impinge corporeally on the enclosing imperial mind.