corpuscular theory of light

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Related to corpuscular theory: wave theory, Electromagnetic theory

corpuscular theory of light

[kȯr′pəs·kyə·lər ‚thē·ə·rē əv ′līt]
(optics)
Theory that light consists of a stream of particles; now considered a limiting case of the quantum theory. Also known as Newton's theory of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
But both explanations assumed the wave theory of light, which, at the time, had superseded the corpuscular theory and, supposedly, both are approximately true.
This maneuver necessitated the combination of ideas from corpuscular theory and field theory, a combination that Einstein later called inconsistent.
Locke gave a detailed account of what such knowledge would yield (a demonstrative, a priori knowledge of phenomena), but he did not think such knowledge was possible for man: the corpuscular theory was useful but not knowledge (pp.
But Achinstein insists that the wave theory of light, for example, did not achieve independent warrant in the early nineteenth century simply because there were reasons to eliminate its only known rival, the corpuscular theory, but instead because there were prior reasons to think that the wave and corpuscular accounts of light are the only genuine possibilities (or at any rate the only possibilities that have any substantial degree of (rational) probability).