corpuscular theory of light

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Related to corpuscular theory: wave theory, Electromagnetic theory

corpuscular theory of light

[kȯr′pəs·kyə·lər ‚thē·ə·rē əv ′līt]
(optics)
Theory that light consists of a stream of particles; now considered a limiting case of the quantum theory. Also known as Newton's theory of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barton's Reply' [1833], was produced by a wave theorist though it was intended as 'a synoptic sketch, which I believe to be perfectly impartial; indeed, I have given every advantage to the corpuscular theory' (Powell [1833], p.
Locke gave a detailed account of what such knowledge would yield (a demonstrative, a priori knowledge of phenomena), but he did not think such knowledge was possible for man: the corpuscular theory was useful but not knowledge (pp.
But Achinstein insists that the wave theory of light, for example, did not achieve independent warrant in the early nineteenth century simply because there were reasons to eliminate its only known rival, the corpuscular theory, but instead because there were prior reasons to think that the wave and corpuscular accounts of light are the only genuine possibilities (or at any rate the only possibilities that have any substantial degree of (rational) probability).
Boerhaave was an enthusiast for Cartesian and Newtonian explanations of matter and motion early in his career and gave expression to mechanical, corpuscular theory in his explanation of how normal and abnormal physiology are determined by the flow of corpuscles of various sizes through vessels and fibers that constitute the solid parts of animal bodies.
For example, he is likely to have been taught a corpuscular theory of matter ultimately derived - via Julius Caesar Scaliger and influences from sixteenth-century Cambridge - from late medieval Aristotelian concepts of minima naturalia.