correct

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correct

In air traffic control terminology, it means “That is correct.”
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References in periodicals archive ?
The condition prevents babies from breastfeeding and can cause other complications but is typically correctible through surgery.
provides 140 sample sentences that include 121 (or 86%) correctible
John explores reasons why that may have happened and how, with some care and attention, such troubles may be correctible and the director salvageable.
955, 955-56 (2014) (innocence "scholarship shows that errors of justice are not inevitable results of human fallibility but are produced by systems that are correctible").
Those that occur are largely correctible, thereby reducing the risk of litigation to a minimum among well informed patients.
correctible but others, like Kent's plumbing, are not, the remedy
[1] The principles of management include timely identification, initiation of CPR, treatment of readily correctible causes and expedited delivery of the fetus, within 4-5 minutes, to achieve optimal outcomes.
Indeed, the data-driven company -- whose technology is used on the financial portals offered by AOL, Forbes and USA Today -- has released a survey timed to coincide with its free-analysis offering, showing that 90% of investors make easily correctible mistakes.
It is all correctible. We just have to come into practice and work on it."
When the storm made landfall in the New York City area, there had to be more hospital evacuations than anticipated because of the lack of on-site generators; this is a correctible problem from which facilities can learn.
The ideal patient for isolated PFA is a non-obese patient less than age 60 that has severe isolated and refractory PF arthritis secondary to trochlear dysplasia, trauma, or correctible mal-alignment.
Although lamentable, it is a fact of life that health services found in rural and impoverished inner city areas are fewer and of lower quality than available to more privileged populations--a condition often ameliorated but seldom correctible due, if for no other reason, that health professionals, for reasons of family and career, are drawn to culturally advantaged and professionally stimulating locations.