corrupt


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

corrupt

1. (of a text or manuscript) made meaningless or different in meaning from the original by scribal errors or alterations
2. (of computer programs or data) containing errors

corrupt

[kə′rəpt]
(computer science)
To destroy or alter information so that it is no longer reliable.
References in periodicals archive ?
They include Bangladesh, India, Indonesia and Philippines, which are ranked among the region's most corrupt nations by numerous surveys, including by Transparency International.
Now Kenya is cleaning out the Augean stables, including sacking 35 public procurement officials for awarding themselves building contracts, and dismissing the head of a corrupt judiciary.
When a corrupt employee takes bribes, the underlying business arrangement usually is flawed.
This little survey conducted by Leger Marketing said 69 per cent of respondents felt the federal system was highly, or somewhat, corrupt, compared with 26 per cent who thought it was not very corrupt or not at all corrupt.
Comparative reviews of problems and best practices, as well as academic research, suggest that corruption follows certain predictable routes and that precursory signs occur prior to any actual quid pro quo corrupt activity.
Their main complaint concerned the corrupt nature of the state, and only thereafter the way in which this corruption led to social and economic ills.
The corrupt and corrupting campaign finance laws are a stain upon the honor of the country.
And they said that the state of Missouri had not cited empirical evidence of corrupt practices or of a perception among Missouri citizens that large contributions exercise a corrosive influence.
In Tanzania, the government's anticorruption drive was itself allegedly corrupt.
The line between an ordinary overseas business deal and a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act is getting fuzzier all the time.
Yet there are those who lament the demise of the time-honored values, and who ache for "origins" in a world they perceive as intolerably corrupt and post-Modern.
Publicly-held firms in countries perceived as less corrupt trade at bigger market premiums than those in places considered more corrupt, according to Lee.