corrupt

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Related to corruptness: debauched

corrupt

1. (of a text or manuscript) made meaningless or different in meaning from the original by scribal errors or alterations
2. (of computer programs or data) containing errors

corrupt

[kə′rəpt]
(computer science)
To destroy or alter information so that it is no longer reliable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quite to the contrary, the corruptness of the regime tends to be inversely correlated with the transparency of its finances.
(2) In newspaper records there was mention of extreme cruelty due to "drunkenness, laxity and corruptness".
The author of the Declaration of Independence, the successor to Franklin in 1785 as minister to France, and the third president of the United States, Jefferson was a man of contradictions, "a human being," writes Wood, "with every human frailty and foible." Notwithstanding the highly refined tastes he developed--Wood reports that no American knew more about wine--Jefferson was distinguished by his fervent belief in the virtue of ordinary people, in the corruptness of powerful central governments, and in the need to keep the state small and at a distance to allow the people's natural sociability to guide their affairs.
Palmer and the social corruptness of Robert and Lucy.
According to Hagman, "Ceausescu had put three hours on TV--two were of political speeches, and one hour was an episode of Dallas--to show the corruptness of America.
The conversion of British tastes was, as Blackburn's sermon announces, only the preparation for world-wide salvation: A century ago, the books which formed the intellectual food of the great bulk of Englishmen, betray, at once, the feebleness of their appetites, and the corruptness of their tastes.
To demonstrate the inhumanity of man to man, and therefore the corruptness of any human institution, I could cite data drawn from every column of the encyclopedia, but my evidence would not support the necessity of our malfeasances, just their prevalence.
In my once-held view, those who had tried to expose the corruptness and oppressive condition of pre-socialist Western life were exaggerating middle-class, capitalist malevolence because of the circumstances of their youth and because of their perpetual search for a "fascist" enemy after their experience with the Nazis.
Later in the century, portraiture often became a marker of artistic failure or corruptness, as with Henry Gowan in Little Dorrit.
And in the thesis of this book, informed by psychoanalytic and feminist theory, there is no doubt about the corruptness of the conservative (= patriarchal) social organization which the melancholic can survey from the certainty of his own uncontaminated loss-bearing loftiness, from the distinction of his role as mourner.
Indonesia tripled per capita incomes in thirty years, despite being run by a regime of almost unbelievable greed and corruptness. And of course there's the People's Republic of China.