corticosteroid


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corticosteroid

[¦kȯrd·ə‚kō′stir‚ȯid]
(biochemistry)
Any steroid hormone secreted by the adrenal cortex of vertebrates.
Any steroid with properties of an adrenal cortex steroid.
References in periodicals archive ?
To his knowledge, this was the first-ever randomized, head-to-head comparison of the effectiveness of a physical therapy regimen versus corticosteroid injections for knee OA.
[USA], Feb 20 (ANI): With help from a dozen clinical variables, researchers have been able to identify using machine learning techniques, which of their patients with severe asthma are likely to benefit from treatment with systemic corticosteroids -- and which might only suffer their side effects.
Intra-articular corticosteroid therapy is a common clinical practice used in the management of osteoarthritis.7,8,12,13 This therapy is also part of the recommendations made by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for the treatment of osteoarthritis, and of the Knee and Osteoarthritis Research Society International(OARSI) guidelines for the non-surgical management of KOA.13,18 But its effects are limited for only 1-4 week.2,7,8,11,12 Intra-articular injection of a combination of local anaesthetic and corticosteroids in KOA is also mentioned in literature.
and few other studies have found no significant improvement with physical therapy, and instead they suggested GH intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid injection having much beneficial effects as compared to other form of treatment10-12.
At this point, the decision was made to proceed with intravitreal corticosteroid therapy.
The obvious individual differences of corticosteroid-induced ONFH may be the combined effect of corticosteroid on multisystem underlying diseases and host susceptibility.
Infants born already 3 hours after corticosteroid administration to the mother had significantly lower mortality than those not exposed to the treatment, and corticosteroid administration 6 to 12 hours before birth was associated with halved risks of infant death.
A sixty-year-old right hand dominant woman with a history of right small finger stenosing tenosynovitis and left thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis presented for corticosteroid injections of both hands.
A recent meta-analysis of 3 trials including 3,200 women at high risk for preterm delivery at 34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks of gestation reported that the corticosteroid administration reduced newborn risk for transient tachypnea of the newborn (relative risk [RR], 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.92), severe respiratory distress syndrome (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.33-0.94), and use of surfactant (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.99).
Most clinicians recommended either an oral, parenteral, or high-potency topical corticosteroid, and some also recommended an oral antihistamine, usually diphenhydramine.
In our study, majority of topical corticosteroid were prescribed in combination (42%).