cosmic background radiation

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cosmic background radiation

Unresolved radiation from space. The cumulative effect of many unresolved – and individually weak – discrete sources provides the background at radio, X-ray, and possibly other wavelengths. One important form is the microwave background radiation, which peaks at about 1 mm wavelength (i.e. a frequency of 3 × 1010 hertz). This is considered to be due to the hot Big Bang. See also COBE; gamma-ray astronomy; infrared background radiation; radio source; X-ray background radiation.

cosmic background radiation

[′käz·mik ¦bak‚grau̇nd ‚rād·ē‚ā·shən]
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the amount of gas within a galaxy cluster can be determined by measuring the small distorting effect it has on the cosmic microwave background radiation.
Before that, the universe was so hot that there were no neutral atoms, only ions and electrons that trapped the cosmic microwave background radiation.
The cosmic microwave background radiation, or CMBR, is riddled with warm and cool spots, or anisotropies, whose temperature departs by a few parts in 100,000 from the average of 2.
Otherwise they would have lost their energy by interacting with photons of the cosmic microwave background radiation.
Burbidge and his colleagues assert that their theory, known as quasi-steady state cosmology (QSSC), recently predicts the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation, a feat that the Big Bang model can't as yet accomplish.
Theory states that these particles cannot travel for billions of years and still pack such punch; collisions with photons of the cosmic microwave background radiation will slow them down.
The two teams presented their data in Italy at the International Conference on the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in Capri and the Gran Sasso Conference on Underground Particle Physics.
The fact that the universe contains about 100 percent of the critical density was dramatically proved in May by two studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (July issue, page 24).
A string should make a difference in our perception of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation on opposite sides of it.
Not only does Rees review the astrophysics of neutron stars, black holes, cosmological dark matter, the cosmic microwave background radiation, and cosmic strings (all subjects to which he has made significant research contributions); he also highlights the origin of the chemical elements, the nature of hypothetical wormholes, and the recent discoveries of planets around Sun-like stars.