cosmopolitan

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Related to cosmopolitans: Cosmopolitical

cosmopolitan

(of plants or animals) widely distributed

cosmopolitan

[¦käz·mə¦päl·ət·ən]
(ecology)
Having a worldwide distribution wherever the habitat is suitable, with reference to the geographical distribution of a taxon.
References in classic literature ?
You dare be impudent," Mr Vladimir began, with an amazingly guttural intonation not only utterly un-English, but absolutely un- European, and startling even to Mr Verloc's experience of cosmopolitan slums.
Head attendant at the Hotel Cosmopolitan. Pray step into the cab, and I shall soon be able to tell you everything which you would wish to know."
Skimpole and the children, and in what point of view they presented themselves to his cosmopolitan mind.
The bourgeoisie has through its exploitation of the world-market given a cosmopolitan character to production and consumption in every country.
The gentleman, after looking towards me once or twice, politely accosted me in very good English; I remember I wished to God that I could speak French as well; his fluency and correct pronunciation impressed me for the first time with a due notion of the cosmopolitan character of the capital I was in; it was my first experience of that skill in living languages I afterwards found to be so general in Brussels.
But Cecil, since his engagement, had taken to affect a cosmopolitan naughtiness which he was far from possessing.
Certainly a man can only be cosmopolitan up to a certain point.
I submitted patiently to my martyrdom (it is surely nothing less than martyrdom to a man of cosmopolitan sympathies, to absorb in silent resignation the news of a country town?) until the clock on the chimney-piece told me that my visit had been prolonged beyond half an hour.
He remembered what a cosmopolitan gentleman Monsieur Lagnier was, and how few weak distinctions he made.
Beros says cosmopolitans consider themselves unbound by any political community, and their loyalty is to a more universal community of all human beings.
Professor Brimm has interviewed Global Cosmopolitans at different life stages and has garnered insights from those on the front line of the global economy.
We do owe Merton credit for establishing that "cosmopolitans", rather than "locals", tend to recognise that the media potentially enables involvement with "the outside world" (1968:461).