CUA

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CUA

CUA

(Common User Access) SAA specifications for user interfaces, which includes OS/2 PM and character-based formats of 3270 terminals. It is intended to provide a consistent look and feel across platforms and between applications.
References in periodicals archive ?
This consortium aims to determine the best possible dialysis treatment by comparing the conventional guideline based haemodialysis treatment versus high-dose haemodiafiltration by carrying out a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial addressing clinical endpoints, Quality of life and a cost-utility analysis.
Articles that had carried out full economic evaluation, including cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-utility analysis, and cost-benefit analysis were included.
Accordingly, this study was aimed to determine economic viability of the PGx of warfarin in the VACHS-affiliated anticoagulation clinic in San Juan, PR through a cost-utility analysis in warfarin-treated Puerto Rican patients, utilizing an Incremental Cost Utility Ratio (ICUR) and establishing a willingness to pay of $50,000 per QALY gained, as well as to explore the range of potential outcomes using sensitivity analysis.
Multiple types of health economic analyses compare cost differences between treatments: cost-consequence analysis, cost-minimization analysis, cost-benefit analysis, budget impact analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-utility analysis.
A cost-utility analysis of hysterectomy, endometrial resection and ablation and medical therapy for menorrhagia.
The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-utility analysis of existing drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in the context of the Brazilian public health system.
4) Cost-utility analysis (CUA) is an established method for assessing "value for money" of a health care intervention using an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER)--dividing the costs incurred by the additional quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained.
A separate cost-utility analysis published earlier this month showed that dutasteride at a cost of $626 per year, down from the current cost of $1,400, was unlikely to be cost effective for chemoprevention use in men at elevated risk for prostate cancer (Cancer Prev.
While it can be used to measure health-related quality of life alone, its main purpose is to measure the 'utility' of health states (that is, the preferences people have for different health states) in a way suitable for use in economic evaluation studies, in particular, cost-utility analysis.
These methods include cost minimization analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-utility analysis.
A cost-utility analysis uses the best information available to estimate the likelihood of all the possible outcomes and the financial costs and health consequences of each of these outcomes.