costal cartilage


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costal cartilage

[′käst·əl ¦kärd·əl·ij]
(anatomy)
The cartilage occupying the interval between the ribs and the sternum or adjacent cartilages.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From July of 2013 to January of 2014, 22 patients underwent diced costal cartilage for nasal augmentation in Plastic Surgery Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College.
Interpositional arthroplasty using autogenous costal cartilage graft for tem- poromandibular joint ankylosis in adults.
In the left side of the chest, the pericardium and the left lung were wounded, the knife passed through the fifth costal cartilage and was still in the wound when he was brought into hospital.
As demonstrated in the present case, costochondritis commonly presents as a local, (2) sharp pain adjacent to the sternum and most often affects the second to fifth costal cartilages.
propose that aberrant muscles, which run between the first costal cartilage and the upper margin of the scapula can be classified into two categories:
Chest wall deformities have been reported in 8% of patients in whom the costal cartilage was harvested between the ages of 6 and 12 years.
It is assumed that the aplasia of the pectoralis muscles and associated chest defects as the athelia aplasia of costal cartilages are consequences of an interruption of early embryonic blood supply of subclavicular artery branches.
Use of costal cartilage cantilever grafts in negroid rhinoplasties.
Pain and a reproduction of symptoms were produced with palpation of the left pectoralis minor muscle, over the costal cartilage at rib 3, 4, and 5 on the left, and the left intercostal muscles on the anterior side of the thorax between rib 3 and 4 as well as rib 4 and 5.
The variant muscle originated from the 2nd costal cartilage and becomes tendinous laterally.
The remaining five are false ribs; the cartilages of eighth to tenth usually join the superjacent costal cartilage whereas eleventh and twelfth ribs are free at the anterior ends (1).
Costal cartilage is an additional option, but most patients prefer the reduced morbidity of an auricular graft and the advantage of a hidden incisional scar.